Fingerpaint & Fine Motor Acorn Craft

fingerpaint acorn craftEven though we don’t see many acorns around here we still love creating fun acorn crafts like this simple fine motor acorn craft. We love mixing colors and I wanted to incorporate making the color brown into our lesson. While you and I know that the simplest way to make brown is to mix two complimentary colors together ( red & green , yellow & purple , orange & blue ) that doesn’t let your child explore as much as I know she’d want to. Instead I let her use trial and error to make it. If paint or time is short put two complimentary colors out and have them mix them together.

The buttons add another dimension to the craft but their inclusion also welcomes counting, shape recognition and some great fine motor work.

Gather your materials. You will need some light colored card stock, a pencil, scissors, plate, paint colors in whatever colors your child thinks will mix to make brown, glue, and some buttons. We also used some paper towel to blot the paint. I find when we finger paint we glop it on super think and this technique is a fun and practical way to make drying time reasonable. acorn craft for children

Start by drawing an acorn on the card stock. I made the bottom part a little longer than usual because after it’s painted you will cut these two sections apart and glue the top onto the bottom. It will need a little extra length so that the bottom and top can be glue together later. acorn craft for kids drawing

Mix the paint. These are the colors we initially chose to mix brown. It ended up too green so we kept mixing. color mixing color brown acorn craft

 

Add more paint as you wish to get closer to brown.  If your child doesn’t want to keep mixing and the color isn’t brown yet. Don’t worry just label the color you did make ” Wow the blue, red and white paint mixed to make light purple, cool!” acorns can be purple, or olive green, or neon yellow when they are handmade acorns. Do not get hung up on everything looking just like it does in nature. If you are worried that your child will think acorns really are purple simply make a note to say that the purple acorn is extra special because in real life acorns are brown. You can get the facts straight but don’t squash the artistic spirit either. acorn painting for preschool

Paint the acorn. We chose to finger paint but you can use brushes, bath poofs, sponges, even bubble wrap would make a cool texture! acorn activity for children

If like my little artist you end up with HEAPS of paint you can blot it with paper towel. I love doing this and my daughter loves it too because it leaves a neat texture behind. acorn craft with finger paint

Let dry. This makes a great 2 day project for a young classroom or a two part one for a older class letting it dry throughout the day and revisiting this second half after lunch.

Cut the top half and bottom half out and then glue back together. Use some of the discarded painted paper to make a little stem. acorn craft for preschool

Time to glue on the buttons. acorn fine motor craft for kidsWhen I envisioned this I imagined an acorn cap FULL of buttons but this wasn’t MY project. I didn’t tell my daughter where to add them just handed her the glue and buttons. Some children might line the cap in buttons, fill it completely, add the buttons to the bottom, maybe even add an initial made of buttons to the acorn… there are so many different possibilities let your little artists explore.button acorn craft for kids

Add glue and buttons. She LOVED watching the glue squish through the holes in the buttons. acorn craft for preschool fine motor development

Let dry again! acorn craft for kids

 

15 Fall Books For Children

 

Need some great fall books for your little readers? These are our favorites! See the full list here.

Acorn Nature Collage

Exploring nature doesn’t have to be in a far off place, a neighborhood park , school yard or your own backyard will work just great. Explore , talk about what you see, hear and smell. Touch things even they aren’t going into your bag for the collage, explore and take note of how the garden, forrest or park you are in has changed since the spring or summer.  I love when I can do an activity with both kids seemlessly and this one was super easy .

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 1-2 paper grocery bags, scissors,crayons,  glue and a yard , park or forrest to explore.
  2. Start by handing each child a bag and heading outside. Can I just say that my little paint covered point and shoot camera works great for inside crafts when movements around too big or fast, but getting a good shot of either child was next to impossible.  Especially a wobbly 15 month old.
  3. Explore- let your child lead the way. Hopefully the other child( or 5) agree and go the same way, or at least in the same general vicinity.
  4. Put everything they find and want to glue to the collage in the bag . Don’t say no to little things yet, let them discover later of it won’t glue.
  5. Huge sticks are totaly ok to refuse, but let them figure it out by asking how it will fit in the bag. Offer scissors to cut a small piece off.
  6. Head back inside and prepare for part two. I did this while they played in the playroom around me, but don’t feel like you have to do this all in one go. Do this after bed time and continue with part two in the morning if that works best for your family. You will want to empty out the contents and place them on a table – or even a shallow box. Using the bag cut it open and draw an acorn.  Tape it to the table to stay steady.
  7. Now invite the children to chose from their treasures and glue them to the acorn.
  8. Hmm the pine branch is too big  to glue down… what could we do?
  9. Cut it!
  10. I helped my daughter add the glue and she happily banged the leaves she gathered down. I was so surprised to see she remembered exactly which leaves she found and used them in her collage.
  11. Gluing is my son’s favorite part of most art because he pretends it’s a bomb ( yes this stage is still driving me batty but I am trying to roll with it)- his sound effects surprised his unamused little sister…
  12. Let everything dry overnight.
  13. Cut out.  Display if possible – kids love seeing their own creations displayed with pride.

More Acorn Crafts!

If a nature walk isn’t possible for you try another one of our acorn crafts .

Click the images for the original posts

 

Fall Crafts

easy fall crafts for kids It’s official summer is but a memory. I hope you made wonderful memories this summer but it’s time for pumpkins, acorns and changing colors. Here are some of our favorite easy fall crafts for kids.

Leaf Garland

Ripped Paper Acorn Craft

Falling Leaves Craft

Pumpkin Printing Activity

Shape Scarecrow

Food Coloring Fall Colors

Fall Sensory Bin with Apples & Acorns!

fall sensory table for kids This fall sensory bin is a great way to welcome the best parts of the coming season, by scooping, pouring and pinching up beans, apples and acorns.  I usually keep a sensory bin theme for a month or two pulling it out every few days and letting my son explore.  Now that he is a little older my son prefers to use the tongs to pick things up . Using a small dish to hold the material he pinches up is a great way to encourage counting and sorting with a sensory tub.Don’t miss our books about apples

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some beans ( we are using pinto and navy), acorns ( real or artificial), some fake apples, scoops and tongs. I use the same container for my sensory tubs usually , and keep the materials in ziplocs while not in use.  I got the acorns and the apples in the potpourri section of a home decorating store. 
  2. Start by pouring the beans into the container.
  3. Add the apples .
  4. Add the acorns.
  5. Add your tools and invite your child to play!apples and acrons sensory play edit
  6. Pinch and count! apples and acorns play edit4

Books About Apples

all our book lists include affiliate links.

Apples by Jacqueline Farmer is not a book to snuggle up and read before bed or really anytime with a toddler but wow it’s a wonderful resource. I didn’t know how much I didn’t know about apples until I read this book. It’s packed full of detail about how they are grown, where they came from originally, varieties and more! I urge teachers and homeschooling parents to check this out if you are doing any study about fruit, or apples.

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I Know It’s Autumn by Eileen Spinelli  is  age appropriate for young preschoolers and  toddlers. The book is a simple look at all the things that tell a small child that Autumn is here. Pumpkin muffins, apple picking, cooler weather,  hayrides and more all signal that the summer is gone and the fall has arrived. I like this book because there will be something a child will relate to and be able to identify with. I also love that the family is biracial and there is no mention of it at all. It’s nice to see and I wish more books were so non challant about representing all kinds of families.

 


Apple Farmer Annie
by  Monica Wellington is another  favorite in our house. My son loves this author and I like how simple but informative this book is. Your little reader will learn about the basics of what happens at an apple orchard , but you can take it further if you want. On many of the pages there are chances to learn more, like the page about sorting and classifying, where there are apples ready to count 1-10, and sorted by colors. I love the last page that says that Annie is so happy to have her own apple farm. I loved that message and think it’s a lot more powerful than some may think, women on farms in most books are “farmer’s wives” and I love that there is no one but Annie doing her own thing.

Acorn Painting!

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I sent out a call for readers to send in their crafts, activities and book recommendations.  I am struggling through bad morning sickness and just being a mom is wearing me out.  But my readers have come to my rescue and I have been overwhelmed by the community that No Time For Flash Cards has become! This awesome acorn craft  was sent in by Kim Young from Mom Tried It! A great blog you need to check out, thank you Kim it’s perfect!

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I try to encourage creativity with my children. Sometimes I find myself thinking in very uncreative ways to be creative. We love to do arts and crafts projects. I try to experiment and expose them to different mediums such as play-doh, flubber-style goo, moon sand, floam, etc. We paint on different objects as canvases such as balls, vegetables, windows, concrete, etc. While some of those things are kind of thinking outside the box, one thing remains constant. We use brushes, markers, crayons, etc. I have got to be more creative than this! So I introduce the acorn. You read that correctly, acorn. Today we are using plain old paper, ordinary paint, but we are using them with acorns. My son was a little taken aback by this. He wanted to use a brush, but after some coaxing he really got into it!

You will need a few acorns (with the tops taken off), 2 pieces of paper, scissors, paint, a plate, and tape.

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Draw a picture of an acorn on a piece of paper. Make sure to leave space in between the top of the acorn and the acorn bottom. Next, cut out the design to make a stencil. To make this project easier for a preschooler, tape the blank paper to a placemat or table, then tape the stencil over the other piece of paper (also to the table or placemat). This will keep everything from moving and frustrating your little one.

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Squeeze some paint onto a plate. I used red, yellow, orange, and brown for beautiful fall colors. Now let your child experiment with the parts of the acorn. You can suggest they use the pieces like stamps. After a few minutes of “stamping”, my son covered an entire acorn bottom with paint and rolled it across the paper. I didn’t think of that. Imaginations can run wild without ruining the picture. The stencil will ensure the picture looks like an acorn no matter how they paint it.

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When you are all finished, simply take off the stencil and let it dry. While it is drying, you can read this great book about – what else – acorns.

Pay no attention to the date on the pictures. I forgot to reset it after I charged the battery. Oops.

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Acorns Everywhere by Kevin Sherry

“Bonk! When an acorn hits him on the head, a chubby squirrel takes stock. And what does he see? ACORNS EVERYWHERE! With a jolt of hilarious manic energy, he gets to work—Gather! Dig! Bury! Readers will know, even if the squirrel doesn’t, that “gather” does not mean prying acorns from the mouth of a scandalized mouse, the beak of an unsuspecting bird, or . . . well, you’ll see. Will this squirrel get what’s coming to him—or will he get something even better?”

My son really liked this book and laughed along with it. It really showed him about hard work and doing it the right way.

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This post was written by Kim Young from Mom Tried It !