Cereal Bracelet Craft

Contributing Writer Kim shares this tasty , easy and really fantastically educational activity with us ! I love her perspective of having two children at different levels, enjoy!

Do you remember candy bracelets?  This activity puts an educational and healthier twist to that bracelet from your past.  All you will need are chenille stems, loop cereal (such as Fruit Cheerios or Fruit Loops), and an egg carton or muffin tin.

This activity is perfect if you have children at different levels of development because it can be implemented in so many different ways.  I have a toddler and a preschooler.  Activities that they can both do at the same time score big points with me.  I gave my daughter an egg carton and asked her to put the cereal in each compartment.  This works great for developing motor skills.

My son was given a muffin tin and asked to sort the cereal by colors.  While both of the children put the cereal in their containers, I folded the tips of the chenille stems inward to make sure the wire did not poke the children.

After my son was finished sorting, I gave him a chenille straw.  I asked which colors he would like to use to make a bracelet.  Out of six colors, he only wanted to use two.  So I asked him to thread the cereal onto the stem in a pattern of green, green, orange, orange. Depending on your child, you can do patterns of ABAB, AABB (like we did), ABCABC, or any other pattern.

While my son was threading his cereal, I tried to show my daughter how to thread the cereal onto the stem.  As soon as we got one piece of cereal on she would chomp on it and giggle.  It was extremely cute and provided her with a ton of fine motor skill practice, but didn’t help me get a picture to share with you.  My daughter is only 19 months old and is not ready for patterns, but simply threading the cereal onto the stem is a great activity.  She also just used the chenille stem as a hockey stick to shoot the cereal onto the floor.  We will just call that a hand-eye coordination building exercise.  Mommy didn’t appreciate it very much and put an end to it quickly.

When my son was finished threading the cereal we talked about the pattern and how it made the string look a certain way because of the pattern.  I put on a purple and a red at the very end and asked him if those two matched the rest.  We talked about how those two didn’t fit in with the pattern, so he decided they needed to be taken off.

To make it a neat bracelet we simply wrapped the chenille stem around his wrist and twisted the ends together.  Now you have a great snack to finish up your fun learning activity.  The best thing about this snack is that it is portable and can be taken along for the fun.

My son’s preschool class does this activity on a regular basis.  As you can imagine it is a big hit with the girls, but met with the same enthusiasm from the boys.  I want to thank my son’s preschool teachers for providing me with a fun learning activity that is so easy to do at home.  I know they aren’t the ones that originated it, but they shared it with me and I thought I would share it with you.

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Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It.

Alphabet Beads – 2 Activities!

Support Your Team!

Olympic Bracelets

When I bought these beads I was trying to decide what to make with them , and inspiration struck today. We are going up to cheer for Canada and the USA at the Olympics and decided to make some jewelry for the occasion. Beading was not easy and my son only did a bit, I wasn’t expecting him to do any this is an activity for 5 and up although as you can see younger kids can help! For a great activity for younger ones scroll down!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some pipe cleaners ( in the country’s colors you are supporting), and some alphabet beads.Olympic Bracelet
  2. Start by searching for the letters. I didn’t ask my son to come help since my plan was for this to be an older child activity, but he came and helped!Olympic Bracelet
  3. Spell out your message.Olympic Bracelet
  4. Thread on!  I threaded all the of the beads on and separated the pipe cleaners to make it fancy ;) For the USA one I threaded the USA on a single pipe cleaner and the hearts on both.Olympic Bracelet
  5. Wrap the ends to make your bracelet.Olympic Bracelet

Uppercase Lowercase Match!

Alphabet Match Game

Games don’t have to be complicated to be fun. This alphabet game is super simple but easy make and fun to play.  The beads are uppercase letters so to make it more challenging for my son who knows his letters, I used lowercase letters in the tin. You could use uppercase letters for beginners or even spell simple sight words for more advanced learners.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need alphabet letter beads, a muffin tin, some paper, a marker , tape and scissors or a circular paper punch.Alphabet Match Game
  2. Write out the letters on the paper.Alphabet Game Match
  3. Punch them out.
  4. Tape into the tin.Alphabet Match Game
  5. Call your sorting superstar to the table! And have fun, it is a game after all!

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Letter Pizza!
Letter Recognition- Links to great lessons
Cereal Box Laptop

Easy Beaded Bracelet

summer camp crafts
I made these all the time as a preteen and with the school year coming to a close I thought I better share some more “big kid” projects for all the older kids of my regular readers. Beading offers a great lesson in patience, fine motor control and patterning. This is easy to do but is adorable, I have been wearing this bracelet around town .

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some seed beads, beading wire, a magnetic or latch clasp, and a small plate or am old yogurt lid works great.
  2. Start by cutting off two pieces of wire, about 2 feet long each. Tie together.
  3. Next secure that to one clasp. I don’t have a set way of doing this, I just tie it on- tug and make a few more knots if it’s loose. trim the ends but not too short because we will be hiding them in the first few beads.
  4. Start adding beads to both strings- so one bead goes over both wires. Carefully thread the end bits of the wires through as well. Repeat with as many beads as needed to cover the end bits.
  5. String 8-12 beads on one wire.
  6. Repeat on the other wire
  7. Now thread both wires through 1 bead. This will make the loop.
  8. Continue until you have enough for a full bracelet. I re did mine 4 times before I liked my pattern, make sure you let your child know that the best part of making something themselves is that there is no right way, if they don’t like the pattern, start again.
  9. Tie on your other clasp and you are good to go. I tucked the wires into the last few beads , so if you want to do that you need to keep the ends a little long so you can handle them.
Naptime Books!I am looking for some guest reviewers for chapter books. If your school age child and you would like to review a book you’ve read please email me with the title, the author , your review , first name and age. The review should be a paragraph or two long .I will be doing 2-3 of these special posts throughout the summer.

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