Button Mural – Number Recognition

button number fine motor math muralMy daughter is a big fan of murals, buttons, and numbers. I love seeing the differences between children while also celebrating their similarities. My daughter has always loved number recognition and picking up teeny tiny objects so this activity was a sure fire hit. What I didn’t expect was for her to complete the whole thing in one sitting. I expected her to do a few numbers then come back to it later. Instead she did them all one after the other and we were almost late for preschool. I loved how many different aspects of working with numbers and quantities this activity naturally encouraged. As you will see not only did my daughter make the shape but she counted, traced, and compared sizes as well. **Please only use items that your child is ready for. If your child is still in a mouthy stage you can use paper cut out shapes instead.**

Gather your materials. You will need some contact paper, painter’s tape, a marker and buttons.button numbers math preschool

Start by attaching the contact paper to the wall. Painter’s tape works great and won’t muck up your walls.math button number mural

Write numbers on the contact paper.button number mural for preschool

I  welcomed my mini math whiz to check out what I was doing in the hall. She started by tracing the numbers and noticing how hard that it to do with contact paper’s sticky surface.button number mural exploring the numbers

Next she added and added and added buttons.button mural adding the buttons Stopping to count from time to time.button mural counting the buttons

She noticed that one button was exactly the same color as her sweatshirt.button color match mural

She kept adding and talking about the numbers she was creating. I loved when she noticed that she needed either one large button or a few little ones to finish off a number. Good little lesson there!button mural finishing the whole things

If your child does one number and is excited that’s great. I originally asked her to choose her favorite and then was going to ask her to choose her next favorite but she just kept going. Go with the flow and look for those little unexpected lessons like color matching and size.

No matter what celebrate !

button numbers all done celebration

 

 

Counting Books

 
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Anno's Counting Book

Anno’s Counting Book by Mitsumasa Anno almost didn’t make it into my library bag. I am so glad it did. This is a wonderful book full of possibilities. There is no text just simple aerial illustrations of a field as it evolves one number at a time. The field fills up quickly and it can be tricky to classify the pictures on each page to match it with the number displayed but once you do , each page is a lesson!

doggies

Doggies by Sandra Boynton has been one of my daughter’s favorite books for ages. If you aren’t familiar with it, it’s a simple counting book about dogs, their different barks and one pesky cat. Toddlers love barking along with it so it’s a great book for places where they don’t have to be shushed, it’s not a great one for quiet only places like a church service.

math books for preschoolers

On the Launch Pad: A Counting Book About Rockets by Michael Dahl was a great find, my son loved counting down from 12-1 with the bright illustrations , simple text and hidden numbers on each page. Something that seems simple but was really awesome was that each page had the number written as a word, shown as a digit and as dots to count. You can take the time to count each dot, read the word or simply recognize the digit!

Ten on the sled

Ten on the Sled by Kim Norman is a really fun and educational book. The book is a new spin on the old song ” Ten in A Bed” but instead of squeezing onto a bed these cold weather animals pile on and off the sled one at a time. What is wonderful from an educational sense is not just the obvious counting element but as each animal exists the sled the verb used for how they exit begins with the same letter as the animal does. My daughter and I read this last night and even though she knows there is a moose and a caribou on the sled she insisted they were reindeer. We stopped each page to count and double check that the correct number of animals were on the sled. It took forever to read and might just have been a kid led tactic to make bedtime stretch out but I can’t say no to counting.

{Fine Motor} Button & Cork Builders

It’s getting to that time of the year when our time outside is limited by bad weather ( we still go out, just don’t stay out as long) and I am looking for new and frugal ways to engage my kids on long days . This idea came from nothing other than staring at my supplies and thinking ” I wonder if this will work?” and it did. Using corks and buttons to build with is fun but add in some Velcro dots and it’s even more fun. After playing I realized how multi-sensory this activity really is with the texture of the Velcro both soft and spiky, the sound of it pulling apart, the hard buttons and the softer corks. Did I mention we had a blast with them too?

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a board or shoe box lid,  some self adhesive Velcro dots, big craft buttons and corks.
  2. Start by putting Velcro dots on the shoe box lid, I only gave her hook dots. I like using a lid like this so that any corks that fall don’t roll too far away and create frustration. Peeling the stickers off and placing them on the lid is fantastic for fine motor development.
  3. Press them on well.
  4. While she did that I put them on buttons and corks. I put one hook and one loop dot on each cork and some buttons got one of each , some just got loop dots.  Ideally try to give it 24 hours before playing after putting the dots on. If your child is insistent as mine was ( what 2 year old wouldn’t be?) you can give them only a few and then return to the rest after 24 hours when the adhesive is at it’s strongest. In my experience none of the dots came off the buttons at all even right after popping it on. The natural corks didn’t fare as well, they stuck fine but when we went to reposition a handful came off.
  5. Play ( now or later) .
  6. Don’t they look like something out of a Dr. Seuss book?
  7. She loved the buttons !

Byron Barton Books about Building

Building a House by Byron Barton is a no frills look at how homes are built. The bright colors and concise wording is perfect for toddlers and young  preschoolers. I love that there is writing on one page and illustrations on the other, makes it super easy to show children the pictures as well as for them to see you follow the text with your finger! My son started enjoying this book well before age 2 and still grabs it for me to read at three and a half although seems to yearn for more details than this simple book provides.

Machines at Work by Byron Barton is a bold and bright book that is perfect for toddlers who are obsessed with construction vehicles. The text is brief but effective. My son loved this book as an infant ,  at 2 he enjoyed reading it, as well as counting the workers and trucks on each page. Now at almost 4 he will still grab it and read it to his imaginary friend Sammy who ” can’t read yet”.  All in all it’s been well loved over the years !

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