Candy Corn Counting

Counting is fun, counting candy is even more fun!  This is a great thanksgiving themed math activity that promotes ” Checking your work” something that not only encourages kids to slow down ( something my son needs when doing tasks) but it also builds independence and confidence. Amazingly it wasn’t my kids who ate the candy after this activity was done… I can’t help it candy corn is so yummy! If you are not a fan of using candy for activities you can easily substitute pom poms or pony beads for the candy or make a turkey like the craft that inspired this activity.

  1. Gather your materials. I used a cheap cookie sheet with raised edges to keep the candy corn contained . Also some brown and green construction paper, scissors, tape and a marker. Oh and of course some candy corn.
  2. Start by cutting out the green husks. Please remember perfection is not the point, I don’t have time to spare and know you don’t either.
  3. Cut out the ear of corn.
  4. Tape to the cookie sheet.
  5. Add numbers. Try to add some easy and some more challenging. If it’s too easy it’s boring, too hard and frustration sets in, either way learning falls flat.
  6. Add the corn!
  7. Check your work.
  8. Next I flipped the husks over and wrote new numbers on, I added the corn and my son checked my work. I purposely made mistakes on two of the ears, and asked him how to fix them. He subtracted on one and added to the other. It was a great add on to a simple counting activity. I will be doing more “fix my math” activities in the near future because he loved that.

Indian Corn Mosaic Craft

by Kim

 

This craft is fast to set up and fun. It can be easily modified depending of the supplies you have on hand, too. Plus, nothing says fall like Indian Corn.

You will need a piece of paper (I used construction paper), self adhesive craft foam, scissors, and a marker. You can use non0adhesive craft foam or even construction paper. You will just need to have some glue, too.

Draw a shape that generally resembles an ear of corn. No artistic ability is needed, as you can see. Then draw so horizontal lines inside the ear of corn.

Cut the foam into small squares. It does not have to be exact, just the general size of the space between your lines that you drew inside the ear of corn.

Let your child start sticking away! There is no rhyme or reason to this. You can encourage them to keep the pieces in the rows you drew. You could also use this craft to explore color patterns. We chose to just make the colors random. I did instruct them to try their best to keep the squares in the rows.

This craft was great for fine motor skills. Little fingers had to peel the sticker backs off. If you are using regular foam or construction paper, just make a line of glue inside the row and have you child affix the squares. I would suggest doing just one row at a time.

Once you are done, you have a genuine ear of Indian corn.

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Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It.

Cut and Paste Thanksgiving Craft

indian corn craft for kids

Scissor skills are important skills for young kids to work on because they aid in handwriting development as well as eye hand coordination. With Thanksgiving coming up my son decided he wanted to make a Thanksgiving craft, this is what we came up with! You don’t have to include construction vehicles in yours but I think it’s a good reminder not to take craft time too seriously.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need brown ( whole sheet), red,white, yellow and orange construction paper ( scrap paper would do well).  You will also need glue, scissors and a marker.
  2. Draw a ear of corn on your brown paper.
  3. Cut your paper into smaller strips to make it easier for your child to cut them.
  4. Start cutting. We shared this task. 
  5. If you want smaller kernels of corn, cut the paper into even smaller strips for your child to cut into pieces.
  6. Add glue ( and construction vehicles if desired).
  7. Using your hands or a front loader and dump truck add the cut pieces on the cob.
  8. Add more glue as needed and keep adding pieces.
  9. My son insisted on using his toy steam roller to press the pieces down so I grabbed a plastic bag to put between the craft and his toy to prevent glue everywhere. 
  10. Let dry.
  11. Cut the husks from the corn.
  12. Color with a brown marker.
  13. glue the husks over the cob and let dry.

Indian Corn Craft

Marshmallow Corn !

indian corn craft

I was looking for a good place to hide Halloween candy and found marshmallows I hid months ago. They were hard and dry and perfect for a craft! If you don’t hide sugary treats from yourself in your kitchen just leave the marshmallows out over night to get stale.  They need to be stale so that your child can color them, without marshmallow bits getting on your markers, or being too squishy to color. Have fun with this, my son thought it was hilarious that he could color the marshmallows and asked at dinner if he could color his fish sticks. Thankfully the markers were put away.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a handful of stale mini marshmallows, yellow and brown construction paper, red, brown , yellow and orange markers , glue and scissors.indian corn craft 001
  2. Start by coloring one end ( or more) of the marshmallows with various colors.indian corn craft
  3. Keep going!indian corn craft 004
  4. While they color the marshmallows draw an ear of corn on the yellow paper and husk on the brown.indian corn craft
  5. Add glue to the corn.indian corn craft
  6. Add the marshmallows.indian corn craft
  7. Color the husk if you want.indian corn craft
  8. Cut the husk out.indian corn craft
  9. Glue it on the top- you can wait until everything is dry to glue it on. I was eager to post this so I fast forwarded a bit. indian corn craft
  10. Let dry and cut out .indian corn craft

Books

This First Thanksgiving Day: A Counting Story by Laura Krauss Melmed is a stunning gem of a book. I can’t believe I haven’t read it before, normally great books like this go through teaching circles like wildfire. The book has so many layers it will keep toddlers and preschoolers alike busy and engaged. The text explains the first Thanksgiving while counting 1-10 in rhyming poetry and the illustrations by Mark Buehner have hidden treasures, see if you can find them! After I return this to the library, I will be buying it for sure!

Thanksgiving

Twas The Night Before Thanksgiving by Dav Pilkey was such a treat to read. It’s a reworking of the classic Christmas poem, with a Thanksgiving twist.  A bus full of kids head off to the turkey farm the day before Thanksgiving and are immediately enamored with the birds. When a child asks the farmer what the axe by the door is for… well let’s just say the truth is told and the kids fall apart. They don’t stay down for long though, the kids outsmart the farmer and their teacher to save the turkeys from the axe. Somehow the author finds a way to make the possible slaughter of these happy friendly, named turkey’s funny. My son was giggling while I was kinda nervous that they’d get the axe! Great rhymes throughout this hilarious book!

Thanksgiving Treat

Thanksgiving Treat by Catherine Stock is a really heart warming book that will take you back to family gatherings of your childhood. The story follows the Thanksgiving day preparations of an extended family and one little boy who just wants to help. He goes from one job to the next where he is always told he is too little, or it’s too dangerous for him to do, and he should go somewhere else. Finally his Grandpa steps in with a very important job and the sad little boy is given new hope to be helpful. I remember being too little, and I know that from time to time my son is told he is too little too, this book is a kind reminder of finding ways to make even our littlest family members feel important and included. My son really liked it as well, while reading it today he stopped me and listed some of the things he is still too little to do, and the things that he has recently been able to do independently. Great book to sit down and talk about with your child.

Bubble Wrap Indian Corn Craft

thanksgiving craft I have been waiting to do this craft for ages but you will see that even fun projects sometimes don’t appeal to cranky 2 year olds, no biggie, just improvise and everyone will have fun. Although I am doing this as a Thanksgiving craft , you can do this while learning about nutrition, cooking or gardening too!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 2 pieces of paper, a crayon, paint, a piece of bubble wrap, a paint brush, glue and scissors.
  2. Draw 2 ears of corn on a yellow or white piece of construction paper.
  3. Mix some paint on a plate, and dip the bubble wrap in it, I blotted it in paper towel first. This was as much as my son would do with the wrap, right after I took this picture I got told ” No , no brush, pease” .
  4. If your child likes bubble wrap have them press the bubble wrap on their corn. My son used a paint brush instead. I did a bubble wrap one though, so you can see the results below ! Let the corn dry.
  5. When your child is painting with bubble wrap or a brush, draw some husks on the 2nd piece of paper.
  6. Have your child paint it brown with a paint brush, as you can see my son was all over this step! Let everything dry.
  7. Cut out the corn – you can see that as cool as the bubble print corn is the one my son made is just as wonderful, so don’t stress if your child goes “off book” it’s all good! It looks almost like he used the wrap in places but it was all dotting with the brush.
  8. Cut out the husks, if your child can use scissors let them do the cutting, and glue to the top of the corn.