Storytelling Activities For Kids

storytelling Storytelling is an important piece of the literacy puzzle. Of all the benefits to encouraging your children to tell and write stories I think the most amazing one is to connect them with their creativity. They take an idea, develop it, and then create something the can share . To me showing children that they can create is incredibly powerful. Of course there are so many side lessons from storytelling like spelling, learning story elements, comprehension, character development, even public speaking.  Here are 20 storytelling activities for children including two of my favorite tools for storytelling puppets and pretend play!

story telling with family photographs

Storytelling with Family Photos
Story Stones from Happy Hooligans
Fill In The Blank Easel Stories
Storytelling with Stamps from Amy Mascott

drawing activity for kindergarten
Toy Catalog Drawing Prompts
Shadow Puppets from Nurture Store
DIY Board Book About Feelings
Storytelling Cards from A Mom With A Lesson Plan
Fractured Fairy Tale Activities
Experience Books For Kids from Twodaloo

All around town photo safari and book
My Neighborhood Photo Safari and Book
Printable Comic Pages from Inner Child Fun
Action Figure Stories
Storytelling Bag from Carrots Are Orange

puzzle story telling at the zoo
Storytelling with Puzzles
Storytelling Basket from The Imagination Tree
Paper Roll Puppets
DIY Story Cubes from Red Ted Art
25 Pretend Play Set Ups
Fairytale Fridge Magnets from Nurture Store

Top 13 of 2013 – Early Literacy and More!

notimeforflashcards2013 was a great year for us and I hope it was for you too. Each year I take a few days to look back and celebrate the most popular as well as my favorite posts we’ve shared. These 13 posts were the most popular post I wrote in 2013. The trend is clear that early literacy is popular. This makes me so happy because writing and sharing ways for parents to work on reading and writing with their kids is my passion. Expect even more of this in 2014!

Is your favorite on the list? If not swing by tomorrow to see my favorites of 2013.

50 Ways To Teach Your Child To Read
8 Ways Parents Discourage Their Kids From Reading
75 Everyday Activities For 3 Year Olds
25 Books With Crafts To Match
13 Creative Ways To Learn Letters
15 Fun Writing Activities For Kids
25 Funny Books For Kids
25 Playful Ways To Work On Fine Motor Skills
15 Easter Egg Crafts For Kids
88 Books That Teach Important Lessons
Sight Word Dominoes & Speed Racer Game
Alphabet Activities For Every Season
23 Books For Fall With Crafts That Match

Paint & Read { and sound it out }

learn to readTwo skills children need to master in their journey to independent reading are segmenting and blending sounds. Segmenting is breaking a word apart into individual sounds and blending is very simply the ability to combine the sounds together smoothly. When we tell a child to sound it out , this is really what we are asking them to do.  This activity was designed for my son who is a great reader but who will often read so quickly that if he encounters a word he doesn’t know he simply guesses and continues. If I ask him to sound the word out he will  still often guess and get frustrated at me for asking instead of slowing down and doing it even though he is perfectly capable of doing so.  I had to come up with a playful way that would force him to chill a little, slow it all down and focus on the sounds.  This activity can be adapted for any level even single sounds or sight words. We did a similar one for toddlers exploring letters here.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some white paper, white wax crayon, dark water color ( container is you need one) , a little water and a paint brush. I also used a clipboard to keep the pages secure while painting. reading
  2. Start by writing out the words you want your child to stretch out. I used a book we’ve recently read to help me think of some words. Many of the words I chose were not a challenge to read , the challenge is to get him to slow down and stretch them out. For new readers you will want to do words like cat, dog, ball, map, off, snap etc…  but know that older children and more proficient readers can still work on this skill with more complex words. paint and read early literacy activity for kids
  3. Next I popped the black water color into the jar and added just a little water. To do this well you want a lot of color but not too much water .
  4. I invited my little reader and explained that he needed to paint over the words SLOWLY and read as he went, then to read the whole word normally. I had to emphasize that the goal was not to guess the word after painting over the first few letters, that the right way to do it was to carefully say each sound then put the word back together. paint and read learning to read activity for kids
  5. The activity was an instant hit. paint and read learning to read activity for kindergartenIt really did get him to slow it down and pay attention to all the sounds in the words instead of just guessing. I was happy to find a tool for him to keep working on these skills without making him feel like I was giving him a remedial task.  paint and readQuick activities likes this one can be thrown together easily with some really fantastic benefits to your child’s reading ability. paint and read early literacy lesson for kids

 

Reading Resources On Pinterest

learn to readOne of my greatest passions in life is to help children learn to read and develop a love of books. Now that I am out of the classroom and online one way I do that is to help other parents support their own children’s learning. Digging to find activities, ideas for struggling readers ,and just the right book has never been easier. I have found incredible reading resources via Pinterest and want to share them with you. These 6 boards have consistently useful pins for all things early literacy. Check them out !

 

1.Reading & Writing Readiness by us … but really it’s a community board made up of great bloggers and wonderful reading and writing ideas.

2.Reading Activities by The Educator’s Spin On It and check out their blog here.

3.Little Book Lovers by Zina Harrington and check out her blog here.

4.Struggling Readers by This Reading Mama and check out her blog here.

5.Literacy by Teachmama and check out her blog here.

6.Early Literacy by I Can Teach My Child and visit her blog here.

 

Do you have a favorite board on Pinterest ? Leave a link in comments so we can check it out!

Summer Reading Bucket List

Summer Reading Bucket List

The school year is almost over and if you are like me you have already started planning your family calendar for the whole season. Before you declare all the planning done take some time and plan your summer reading adventure!

Summer reading isn’t just for fun it’s the best way to prevent summer slide. Did you know that it’s estimated that teachers spend on average 4-6 weeks re-teaching material children have forgotten over the summer? Think of all the time that teachers could have for other things if we send our kids ready to learn new material instead of reviewing and re-learning . My kids and I brainstormed fun, silly and educational ideas for summer reading and came up with this bucket list. Follow the links to book recommendations .

  1. Read in a tent.
  2. Read a book about wild animals.
  3. Read a book in the bath.
  4. Read a book under a tree.
  5. Read a book about a city far away.
  6. Read at dinner.
  7. Read a magazine.
  8. Read as a family.
  9. Read a book about your country.
  10. Read in a blanket fort.
  11. Read a book about friendship.
  12. Read a comic book.
  13. Read at the park.
  14. Read a magazine.
  15. Read a book about art.
  16. Read a book that makes your laugh.
  17. Read a book with a flashlight.
  18. Read a book to a pet.
  19. Read at the beach.
  20. Read a book about space.
  21. Read a book in a funny accent.
  22. Read a book while having ice cream.
  23. Read a book then act it out.
  24. Read a book and capture it on video.
  25. Read a biography.
  26. Read a book with chapters.
  27. Read a book about bugs.
  28. Read a book without any words.
  29. Read an alphabet book.
  30. Read a pop up book
  31. Read at breakfast.
  32. Read a book you wrote yourself.
  33. Read an ebook .
  34. Read all summer long.

 

As you know together with Amy Mascott I write  all about family literacy for Scholastic Parent’s Raise A Reader blog .  On Monday night we will be taking over  Scholastic Parent’s Facebook page for a great kick off of their Scholastic Summer Challenge. This year is set to be the best yet and Amy and I will be answering questions to get you and your family ready for a summer filled with reading. Do not miss it!

 

summer-reading-facebook-chat