DIY Emotional Intelligence Card Games For Kids

emotional intelligence game for kids  I take a lot of pictures of my kids and not just for the blog. I wanted to use these pictures to help my children develop stronger emotional intelligence especially reading other people’s emotions. This may seem like an easy thing to do ” Just look at how they are feeling.” but it’s not. Young children are naturally self centered and giving them playful ways to stop and think about not only how someone is feeling but why someone is feeling like that is a really worthy activity. I decided to use their own faces because they are familiar with them, I am not quizzing them on reading emotions I am just trying to build this skill and using something comfortable and familiar helps them get to the heart of the lesson. These emotional intelligence card games were a cinch to make, let me show you how!

For a similar activity for a much younger audience try our DIY Emotions Photo Book.

Gather your materials. You will need some photos of your kids will all sorts of emotions. You can use other family members or friends as well but I would stick to familiar faces. You will also need  glue, card stock, scissors, and contact paper if you want to make these last for more than a few rounds of games.feelings game for kids

To make the photos a uniform size I find the easiest way is to use an online editing tool like picmonkey.com ( no I am not working with them, just a huge fan) and make a collage with all my photos, then print out two copies so I have a pair of each. I made a collage of 16 photos and then printed two copies.Emotion Memory Cards

Cut them out and glue to your card stock. Make sure there is room between each picture so in the next step the contact paper has a spot to adhere.feelings activity for kids

Place the whole sheet face side down on a sheet of contact paper.emotions match game for kids

Cut out and get ready to play.

emotions cards for kids

Before you play go through all the cards with your kids. Talk about the emotions and ask them to choose 2 cards each to talk about. Ask them what they were feeling in the cards, ask them if they can mimic the face and how it feels to do that. talking about emotions game for kids

 

Game #1

 

Emotional Intelligence Memoryemotions and feelings game for kids

Shuffle and place all the cards face down.

Take turns flipping over two cards. If it’s a match yell match and then IDENTIFY the emotion on the card. The game doesn’t continue until this step is taken. Spend time helping them read the emotion if you need to. you keep the cards. If it is not a match you return them to the exact location where you got them.emotion game for children

Keep playing until there are no more cards on the table ( or floor) and whoever has the highest number of pairs in their hand wins.

 

Game #2

 

Emotional Intelligence Go Fish

Shuffle the cards and give each person a few. Place the rest in a messy pile in the middle.

emotions and feelings go fish game

The youngest goes first asking one other player if they have a specific card. *** This is an important part of the game*** They must as for cards with the emotions. ” Do you have me feeling frustrated?” or ” Do you have you feeling happy?” this is where they will practice the skills we want them to.

If no one has the match go fish. When the player pulls out the card from the pile they must identify the emotion on it if it’s a match, if not place it back into the pile.

The winner is the person with the most matches.

emotions

 

Books About Emotions

Pair activities with great books to deepen learning and understanding. All our book lists include affiliate links.

feelings by aliki

 

Feelings  by Aliki is a book full of vignettes about emotions. From simple ones that make it clear what the children in them are feeling and how readers could see the situation to more complex and less clear ones that give readers a chance to discuss and decide for themselves what the people might be feeling. I love this book. Neither of my kids liked it as toddlers or preschoolers though. My son started really liking it at about 6 because that was when he could really talk about it all with experience and empathy. We rarely read it cover to cover instead picking and choosing pages and diving into the topic they are covering. It’s not a sugary sweet book but it’s an incredible tool.

when sophie gets angry really really angry

When Sophie Gets Angry–Really, Really Angry… by Molly Bang is a book I bought while teaching. I had a lot of anger issues in my classroom and we spent a lot of time reading books about anger to diffuse it. When I suggest this book to parents I often get ” Really , kids like this?” as a response because the book seems much simpler than their expectations. It is simple. It is basic and yes it does include Sophie running away from the house to go be by herself which is something not all parents like. It also doesn’t include any discipline for her outburst which is also something that I hear complaints about. Here’s the thing what kids relate to is feeling angry, doing something about it , and becoming calm.  I think Sophie has great self control , she knows that she needs to go be alone for a bit to calm down and then re-join the group. It’s exaggerated for effect but really this book is about learning how to stop raging not about encouraging it. Kids LOVE it. They relate and love knowing that after you calm down you can be welcomed back into the group.

the way I feel

The Way I Feel by Janan Cain is a useful book. It labels feelings with a short rhyming piece of text and fanciful illustrations. While I wouldn’t suggest this as a book for a nightly read it is useful while specifically learning and talking about emotions. I like to have children show me their faces in the same feelings as the book progresses. If you are reading this with a small group or your child stop and talk about times when you felt these emotions.

For more books about feelings check out our full round up by clicking here. 

 

Peace Sign Activity For Kids

peace poster activity for kidsTrying to explain inner peace to young kids is not easy. Trying to suggest creating a place for your child to recharge, think positively and find balance isn’t either. Last year my son went off to full day kindergarten. The academics weren’t a big challenge for him but the length of the school day was. He had very little time to recharge and when he got off the bus he was a tornado. He was struggling because he didn’t have all the tools he needed to find little ways to recharge throughout the day. He couldn’t find peace through all the activity.

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This week my son and I explored Playful Learning Ecademy ‘s Be A Peacemaker eCourse and after learning many new tools the activity in this post sponsored by Playful Learning was created to reinforce some of what we learned.

Of all the lesson in the course the one that we both connected most deeply to was one where participants are asked to describe what peace looks, feels,smells, tastes and sounds like. My son’s answers were on one hand wiser than his years and the next perfectly perfect for a 6 year old. After we took the course I decided to extend the learning by combining creating a peace spot and a sign or poster of what he thought peace looked like. My hope is that when is is out of control, anxious, or just unable to stop thinking he can see his peace poster and think about what peace looks like and all he learned about how to turn those negative thoughts and worries into positive ones and be at peace.

peace looks like love

Here is how you can make a peace sign ( as my son calls it)  with your child and use it as a conversation starter to talk about being a peacemaker. One of my hopes for this activity was for my son to take a moment of peace and create. Usually when we make things we do it together and when you get the two of us together you can bet at least one of us is talking. So going outside alone to create was as much the lesson as what he created.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need the a piece of paper , a clip board, some pencils and/ or pencil crayons. I had multiple copies of my poster outline so that if he wanted to start again he didn’t have to leave the yard and break his creative space. That is also why I had the clip board in case he wanted to take it off the deck and into our woods to complete.peace poster supplies
  2. Encourage your child to find a quiet spot outside to sit and think about peace. Bring them all the materials and make sure they know there are no right or wrong answers. Do not tell them to keep going if they are done in 2 seconds. This is their peace poster.peace poster activity for kindergarten
  3. Ask them to explain the poster to you even if you think you can figure it out. I found this so important. Knowing that love is how my son sees peace makes so much sense and I think you will find a certain insight into your children’s minds too.peace looks like love
  4. Put it up in the spot where your child feels the most peaceful. I love that his is by his bed because it gives me a chance to talk about it before he falls asleep at night. peace spot
  5. After he was done my daughter who is still a little young for the course proved she wasn’t too young to create her own peace. Her answer was pink. Peace looks like pink.future peacemaker

This exercise is just a tiny taste of what Playful Learning Ecademy Be A Peacemaker course can offer you and your kids. I really do believe in the value these course can offer families and know that my family has been helped by taking them. Before school starts and my son gets overwhelmed we will be reviewing the tools he has learned so he is better prepared for the long days ahead.

 

What tools do you use with your family use to practice finding peace and staying positive ? Share your ideas below or on our Facebook Page!

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This post was sponsored by Playful Learning and contains affiliate links.

 

Teaching About Emotions – It’s OK To Have A Bad Day

Yesterday was one of those days.  Almost everything that could go wrong while flying from one side of the country to the other did. All day I kept thinking about how this was my own real life version of Judith Viorst’s  classic Alexander and The Terrible, Horrible, No Good ,Very Bad Day. I kept telling myself and my kids each time I called that some days really are just like that and it’s OK to be frustrated, disappointed and mad that I wasn’t home when I said I would be. I was frustrated, disappointed and mad too.  I had a post planned for today but I am too exhausted to finish it and all I want to do today is snuggle my kids and wait for the airline to drop off my suitcase that somehow didn’t make it on to my flight with me. Let’s just hope it’s not in Australia.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst was another childhood favorite that I have enjoyed sharing with my own son. This book is beautiful, even though it may take a few reads to soo it’s not a story about a whining little boy so much a lesson that sometimes things do not go our way. Days can suck. It’s just the way it is. As a child I related to Alexander’s feelings of frustration and things being unfair. How often to you hear a child say “No Fair!” probably a lot. This book taps into that feeling, being little is hard but just because you are mad, or your day was bad doesn’t mean you get your way. Great book to talk about anger and frustration with your child, and it’s funny too

 

The book titles in this post are affiliate links. 

 

Emotional Snowmen – Exploring Feelings with Kids

by Kim

We talk about emotions a lot in our house. When you foster, it kind of comes with the territory and makes things a lot easier to have open communication. So I am always trying to come up with new ways to talk about emotions and feelings with my children. Enter my “emotional snowmen”. They are drama queens (even worse than my 3 year old daughter).

To do this activity all you will need are toothpicks, marshmallows, and food markers. These markers are completely edible and can be found at craft stores. I purchased mine in the cake decorating aisle of Wal-Mart. They were around $5 and we use them on all sorts of stuff. I highly recommend them.

Take two marshmallows and stick them on a toothpick. Be sure to leave enough of the toothpick out to attach another marshmallow.

Have your child draw a snowman face. You can open the dialogue by asking them how their snowman is feeling today. When they tell you, you can ask them to draw a face that shows Mommy how they look when they are _________.

My snowman was feeling silly. We made many different types of faces. We talked about things we do when we are feeling the way each face looked. We also talked about what we can do to help change our moods.

Then we acted out each mood and emotion.

 

Each child had one snowman body and then different heads to change out.

This is such a great ice breaker for new children or just getting your children to open up to you. Sometimes young children have trouble processing and understanding the emotions they feel. This activity really helps them, plus it is perfect for the colder weather.

Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It.

 

Design Your Own Jack-O-Lantern

I have a slight obsession with dry erase these days. It makes sense though, dry erase projects allow children independence and a less frustrating experience if they are unhappy with what the’ve written or drawn. For our house this is a godsend. My son is a reluctant drawer and writer. He will look at me and say ” I’ll just do abstract!” and part of that is because he is also a perfectionist and it’s frustrating when things aren’t as neat as he wants them to be. The dry erase helps him explore in abstract or not.

    1. Gather your materials. You will need some orange and green card stock, a hard piece of cardboard or canvas , scissors and some clear contact paper.

  1. Start by drawing a basic pumpkin shape on your orange paper. 
  2. Cut it and a green stem out and place on your canvas. cardboard.
  3. Cover with clear contact paper.
  4. Create!  I made the faces to show readers all the possibilities for teaching about emotion with this craft .
  5. My son just created , ths tricky thing about dry erase is his creations were gone before I could get pictures!

Halloween Books

Pumpkin Eye by Denise Fleming is a wonderful Halloween book for kids who are old enough to feel like Halloween is a spooky night, but still too young for anything graphically frightening.  The text is short but rhymes beautifully and grabs your child’s attention almost as effectively as the illustrations do. The story is all about Halloween night and the sights and sounds on one street as the night goes on. Both my kids have been grabbing for this book off our shelf when I ask which book they want to read . If it can be a favorite for an almost 5 year old boy and a 15 month old girl I say it will probably be a hit at your house too.

Big Pumpkin by Erica Silverman is a staple in most preschool classrooms. It’s a cute story about a witch who is desperate for pumpkin pie but her giant pumpkin is too big for her to pick up! Luckily she enlists the help of a ghost, vampire, mummy and bat and with a little teamwork they save the night! The rhyming text is almost like a song and kids love it! It’s possibly my son’s favorite Halloween book and I love that it’s the smallest creature who uses it’s brain not brawn to solve the problem.

Patty’s Pumpkin Patch  by Teri Sloat is a great alphabet book and story in one. Readers follow a pumpkin patch from planting the seeds until after Halloween when they gather the seeds for the next planting.  I really like how this book combines an alphabet book with both upper and lowercase letters corresponding to some animal or insect in the story . I also like the easy rhythm of the rhyming text and the engaging and detailed illustrations . All in all I think this is a great fall book!