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Pilgrim Hat Cookies!


When I saw these cookies I gasped, my husband thought I was watching the Twilight trailer again ( come on admit you are excited!) but these little gems were exactly what I was looking for. I doubt the austere pilgrims would indulge in such decadent cookies but I am glad we get to! Jessica over at The Entertaining Kitchen is full of wonderful ideas! Pop over there and check it out, I am in awe!

For full directions and more pictures go to


Bubble Wrap Indian Corn Craft

thanksgiving craft I have been waiting to do this craft for ages but you will see that even fun projects sometimes don’t appeal to cranky 2 year olds, no biggie, just improvise and everyone will have fun. Although I am doing this as a Thanksgiving craft , you can do this while learning about nutrition, cooking or gardening too!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 2 pieces of paper, a crayon, paint, a piece of bubble wrap, a paint brush, glue and scissors.
  2. Draw 2 ears of corn on a yellow or white piece of construction paper.
  3. Mix some paint on a plate, and dip the bubble wrap in it, I blotted it in paper towel first. This was as much as my son would do with the wrap, right after I took this picture I got told ” No , no brush, pease” .
  4. If your child likes bubble wrap have them press the bubble wrap on their corn. My son used a paint brush instead. I did a bubble wrap one though, so you can see the results below ! Let the corn dry.
  5. When your child is painting with bubble wrap or a brush, draw some husks on the 2nd piece of paper.
  6. Have your child paint it brown with a paint brush, as you can see my son was all over this step! Let everything dry.
  7. Cut out the corn – you can see that as cool as the bubble print corn is the one my son made is just as wonderful, so don’t stress if your child goes “off book” it’s all good! It looks almost like he used the wrap in places but it was all dotting with the brush.
  8. Cut out the husks, if your child can use scissors let them do the cutting, and glue to the top of the corn.

Letter of The Week V v !

Vegetable
V !

I really wanted to do a “Vote V” but the idea was too abstract for my 23 month old, however I would encourage older children to clip pictures of candidates out, make mini ballots and go for it! Also it may seem like taking the kids along to vote tomorrow is a hassle but it’s a great education for them, if I was able to vote I’d be tagging my little man a long with me!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a sturdy piece of construction paper or card board ( cereal box) , some white paper, crayons, glue and scissors.
  2. Start by making a big V on the cardboard.
  3. Draw 4-5 vegetables , if your child is able to have them do this. I try only to do the steps that my child can’t.
  4. Have your child color the vegetables if you drew them, talk about what they all are, ask if they like them etc…
  5. Time to color the V ! Don’t forget to talk about the letter itself, if your child is old enough ask them what starts with V and what sound does it make.
  6. While your child is doing that cut out the colored veggies. My son grabbed the mushroom and decided he didn’t like it, another reason for making 5, some may be subject to harsh toddler treatment!
  7. Add glue and add the vegetables to the V, let dry.
  8. Cut out and if you want glue it to another piece of paper.

Book!

” Eating the Alphabet” by Lois Ehlert is an alphabet book extrodinare! Wonderful paintings of fruits and vegetables seem ultra simple and it is but somehow the way the author has pieced this simple book together is brilliant. Maybe it’s that children learn about food at the table multiple times a day and feel proud being able to identify not only some of the letters but some of the pictures too! From a teaching standpoint I love that there are both upper and lower case letters on each page! This book will grow with your child, and beware it will also make you
hungry!

Additional Activities Here are a few other fun art activities for a vegetable theme :

Mushroom , Potato and Onion Printing.

 

 

 

Five Senses : Yummmmmmy!

Chocolate Covered
Frozen Bananas

To end our week of “Five Senses” I decided to make my son a fun and not too full of crap treat. We had theses at our friends house a few weeks ago and loved them, so thank you Mandy for the inspiration! For taste and smell ideas for preschoolers scroll down past the bananas, these two senses are tricky for really little ones so a cooking activity where you can give your child lots of chances to taste is a great option for both smell and taste!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need bananas, baking chocolate ( for 4 treats I used .25 lbs) , butter , popsicle sticks, wax paper, a dish and a freezer!
  2. Start by peeling your bananas , cutting them in half and insert the popsicle sticks.
  3. For every .25 pound of chocolate or chocolate chips, add 1/2 tablespoon of butter to make it easier to spread. Melt . I put it in the microwave for 20 seconds, stirred it and then another 20.
  4. Ooops have we been learning anything? If you want you can have your little one “taste” the bowl, ask them how it tastes, I think my son liked it!
  5. Spread over bananas and put them in the freezer.
  6. Let set

Preschool
Taste & Smell Activity

In years past I have done taste tests in my classrooms. They were always a hit and made big impressions, always a plus in a learning environment. Here is what I did:

  1. Make a chart- simple or big depending if you are doing this for one child or a class. On the chart list ( pictures for preschoolers, written words for school agers) 3-5 flavors of food ice cream, yogurt, and jelly bellies have all worked well for me. Make sure the flavors are simple like strawberry, lemon, vanilla etc…
  2. In identical cups put the food to taste.
  3. Have your child smell the first cup, ask them to predict the flavor- choosing from the chart’s list. Make a note of their prediction.
  4. Have them taste it. Ask them if they want to switch the prediction or keep it as is.
  5. Reveal the flavor.
  6. Repeat.

On paper this seems very simple but it’s fun and a fun way to learn about taste and smell as well as introducing young children to the process of a real science experiment !

Salt Art For Kids


summer crafts for kids
I have done this colored sand activity over the years but without any sand on hand, I made my own colored salt and the results were awesome! My toddler helped some but like all of my ” Naptime Creations” this is for older children. These salt art jars make great paper weights or colorful balloon weights for parties.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some Kosher Salt, food coloring, a bowls for mixing, a fork and a glass jar. I am using a large jar but for kids a great option are baby food jars! You may also want a straw and a funnel.
  2. Pour some salt in your bowl and add some food coloring.
  3. Start mixing right away. My toddler loved this but the whole activity is not toddler friendly at all, you will want to do this with school age kids. You will have to help, I had to mix it like I was beating an egg. It takes a minute but it works!
  4. Mix multiple colors.
  5. Pour one color into your jar. Shake gently to make level. You can make cool stripes filling the jar like this the whole time. Or…
  6. You can use a straw to make a tunnel to the bottom and fill with a different color for a cool effect.
  7. Although I didn’t , you can also add sea shells, sparkles or anything you like.
  8. Fill all the way, I ran out of colored salt , so I filled the rest with regular salt and tightened the lid. You don’t want any wiggle room or the salt will mix and the design will be ruined.