Letter of The Week H !

Hand H

I have the best readers and months and months ago Lyn from Tacoma sent me a photo of her letter of the week project A for Arm. I’ve been wanting to do a post about the human body and I was so pleased when I got to mix that theme with the letter of the week.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 3-4 pieces of construction paper, crayons, scissors and glue.
  2. Write a large uppercase H on one piece of paper and set aside.
  3. Trace your child’s hand on the other pieces of paper. This was the best out of 5 photos I tried to take.
  4. If you have a wiggler like me trace it just once, cut it out and use that one as a stencil.
  5. Have your child color the hands.
  6. Cut them out.
  7. Cut the H out and glue onto the remaining piece of paper.
  8. Add glue for the hands.
  9. Add your hands and let dry.

Books

“Parts” by Tedd Arnold is so funny. Readers follow along as a 5 year old boy begins noticing things about his body he’d never noticed before like belly button lint, snot, peeling skin and more. His anxious assumptions about his body falling apart will have you in stitches. My 2 year old laughed and got most of the humor but slightly older children will be laughing hysterically at how silly the little boy’s worries are.


“Is This My Nose?” by Georgie Birkett is a board book that is perfect for babies and toddlers. The text is short and repetitive and asks the reader to find different body parts and praises the when they do. I read this to my son tonight expecting him to proclaim it for babies, instead he lit up and showed me happily where all the body parts were. He loved it.


“Here Are My Hands” by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault is another book that takes the reader through different body parts and what they do. We enjoyed reading it and taking time to do the things that each body part was assigned to do. The page with ears bugs me though, I understand that saying ears are for washing and drying is a cute take on “wash behind your ears” but even at 2 my son looked at me and said ” No ears hear!”. Over all though we enjoyed this book and the big illustrations by Ted Rand that span two pages.

Letter Of The Week and More !

Heart H !


How could I not do this? I already did a heart H previously and was just going to repost it but when my son woke up from nap early ( don’t you hate that?) he asked for art so we made a new one, he was pretty little when we did the last so it was fun to do a slightly different version with glitter foam.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 2 pieces of construction paper, some foam sheets, glue , markers and scissors.
  2. Draw a large H on one piece of construction paper.
  3. Have your child color the H if they want, mine was eager to glue so we skipped it.
  4. While they color ( if they color) cut out some hearts from the foam sheets.
  5. Time to glue !
  6. Add the hearts. We talked about the big and little hearts and how we wanted to keep them in the H, not out of the H. I have been sneaking in these little lessons while doing art. If they get frustrated with you drop it but if you get a dialogue going, run with it! Let dry.
  7. Cut out the H
  8. Glue on to the 2nd piece of construction paper.
  9. Show off your awesome work !
Additional Activities

Heart Match


Sorting, classifying and matching objects are all skills that parents probably see their children doing naturally. These are all skills we want to encourage as they are important foundations for math, logical thinking and problem solving. Here is a super quick and easy activity we have been having fun with all weekend.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some fun paper, I am using card stock I had on hand, but if you are doing this with a toddler I would stick to solid colors. The patterns were tricky for my son at first. We want it to be challenging but not frustrating. You will also need a heart paper punch or scissors and a tray or dish with multiple compartments. I got this one at the dollar store for 99 cents !
  2. Make multiple hearts in the different papers. If your child is very young start with 2 colors, and add more for older , more experienced kids.
  3. Take one of each color/pattern and tape it to the bottom of the container as a guide for your child.
  4. Invite your child up to test out the fun . * Since making this early on Saturday it’s been played with 5 times, definitely worth it!

Letter Of The Week ! H h!

Happy Heart
H !


My son is smitten with hearts right now so this was an easy way to harness his interest while doing a fun letter of the week project. Using all different color hearts this doesn’t end up looking like a valentine, but does reinforce the letter and the shape!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some fun scrap paper or construction paper to make the hearts, 2 full pieces of construction paper , glue , scissors , markers and a heart shaped paper punch. You can cut out the hearts individually too, especially if you are doing this with an older child who can cut their own , or have a helpful older sibling willing to help!
  2. Draw a Fat uppercase H.
  3. Have your child color with markers or crayons. Th not only stretches out the activity a little it gives them practice for early writing skills. Don’t worry if they say they are done after one scribble, that’s normal, offer another color and if it’s a no go move on.
  4. Cut out the hearts ,I used a punch but feel free to draw hearts and cut them out.
  5. Spread the glue.
  6. Spread the hearts!
  7. Let dry.
  8. Cut out and glue onto another sheet of construction paper. This helps the shape of the letter stand out and makes it less likely to rip.

Books!


I don’t often use books that start with the letter of the week because they don’t usually reinforce the sounds and letter really obviously. However this week I am because all three of these books do it well!

“Horns to Toes And In Between” by Sandra Boynton is a fantastic little book. There are lots of great H words featured, and they are all written in uppercase which for children first learning to recognize letters is a great things since they rarely learn both the lower and upper case at once. Sandra Boynton is a master at great little books, if you aren’t familiar with her books, take some time at the library and check them out!

” Hungry Harry “ by Joanne Partis is a cute book about a hungry little frog out searching for his first meal on his own! This is a fun book to read to children learning their letter sounds since it is easy to exaggerate the sounds in Hungry and Harry. It’s a fun story too!

” Bob’s Busy Hammer” by Kiki Thorpe is the rare character book you will find in my library. In my opinion I would rather a child read character books than nothing but in general these books are the white bread of children’s literature.popular but have no substance. That said this book is great for 2 reasons, it doubles as a hammer and for a child learning about H words, a book in the shape of a hammer reinforces the letter and sounds in a novel way.