Letter of The Week I

Island I !

When I asked my son what we could make with the letter I he suggested an igloo, which excited me that he knew that igloo started with I but being July , I suggested we make something less wintery. Not sure that the island looks like and I , it sorta looks like just a palm tree but the lesson did the trick my little sponge has been saying ” I igloo, I island” .

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 5 different colors of construction paper paper, glue, crayons or markers, and scissors.
  2. Start by writing a large upper case I on the brown paper.
  3. Have your child color the I. My son was in a monochromatic mood, matching most of his crayons to the paper.
  4. While they do that draw some palm leaves, waves and a sun.
  5. Have them color those as well.
  6. Cut everything out.
  7. Glue the waves on first
  8. Add more glue
  9. Add the I
  10. Add the leaves
  11. Add the sun
  12. Let dry.


” An Island in the Soup “ by Mirelle Levert is an award winning book , and it’s easy to see why. The story follows a little boy who refusing to eat imagines a fantasy world in his bowl of soup, it rains peas and carrots and he encounters a bad fairy but in the end he eats his delicious soup. The illustrations are perfect although the bad fairy’s unibrow is very very frightening!


“It’s Mine!” by Leo Lionni is one of my favorite books to pull out when I hear those words… which I have recently. The story is about 3 frogs who all live on a small island, and fight all the time. They take turns claiming this or that never sharing with each other. When a flood comes they learn that they need to rely on each other and share in order to survive. After they learn their lesson they see that the island is a happier place to be when all their energy isn’t spent fighting and screaming “It’s mine” to each other.

“An Island Grows” by Lola M. Schaefer is so pretty it reminds me of what the store Anthropologie would look if it was a children’s book about how islands are formed. It’s part antique fabric, part funky modern floral patterns… this was the book that I was saying “Whoa” each time I turned the page. It does a great job explaining how islands grow from under water volcanoes too !

Letter of the Week ! I i !

Ice Cream I !

Who doesn’t love ice cream? This activity can help teach the letter I , but it can also be used as a lesson about shapes and a simple math lesson. We only put on one scoop but you can add as many scoops as you can count!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 3 or more pieces of construction paper, crayons, scissors, glue and cotton balls if desired.
  2. Start by drawing a large I . Don’t cut it out yet.
  3. Have your child color and decorate the I, let them know that it’s going to be the cone of an ice cream cone. Ask them about the shapes they normally see on a cone, if they tell you a shape ask them to draw it on the cone. If they aren’t quite there yet, don’t push. It’s more important they are enjoying this activity , then us adults trying to cram in 4000 lessons into one. Go with their flow!
  4. While they are coloring and possibly drawing diamonds or other fun shapes, cut out one or more half circles for the scoops or ice cream. I made my scoop look more like ice cream but if you are using this as shape lesson simply use a perfect half circle.
  5. Cut everything out and glue together. Glue the I on the backing paper first, then the ice cream.
  6. Add more scoops if you want, and you can make the ice cream 3D by gluing on a few cotton balls.
  7. Let dry.
Books!


” Ice Cream , The Full Scoop”
by Gail Gibbons is a fascinating book all about, you guessed it, ice cream. It touches on the history of the tasty treat, how it was made in years past and how it is made today. As someone who once called St. Louis home, I was happy to see it also talks about the very first ice cream cone that debut at the 1904 World’s Fair in good old St. Louis! This book is not for toddlers or young preschoolers, it may even be too long for some 5 and 6 year olds. The delivery is fun with a lot of pictures so even if the whole book is too much, bits and pieces in small does much like ice cream is perfect!

“Manana, Iguana” by Ann Whitford Paul is a great book. It is a re telling of Chicken Little with a fun twist. The sky isn’t falling in this tale, instead Iguana is throwing a fiesta and although her friends say they will help, they all back out. She stands her ground and in the end they learn that you don’t get to have your cake and eat it too! The best part about this book is it’s use of Spanish mixed in with the English text. Small children will pick up on these words quickly and any exposure we as parents can give our children different languages is a benefit to them.