Letter Of The Week ! J j !

Jelly Bean J !

I know what you are thinking, there is NO way you can do this craft with your child because they will eat the jelly beans. I did it with a class of 3 year olds and laid down the rule that if they did not eat any jelly beans while doing art, they got to have 3 after they were done.
It worked. Now at home with mom and a 20 month old thi
ngs were a little different , as long as he was presently eating a jelly bean he would happily glue others on, and not eat those ones. You can also draw some paper jelly beans, but that doesn’t make the same impact, which when you are introducing a letter impact counts.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 2 pieces of construction paper, something to draw with ( we used pencil crayons) , glue , scissors and of course jelly beans! We used natural ones that are so yummy, also the color doesn’t run in the glue.
  2. Draw a big upper case J.
  3. Have your child color and draw on it. My son went to town on this step today. Don’t cut it out until later.
  4. Add the glue. I dotted glue all over so that my son would see he was supposed to be putting the jelly beans on. I found with older kids giving them a number and telling them to put that many glue dots works well, then the jelly beans can go on, and you can repeat.
  5. Add the jelly beans.
  6. Let it dry completely.
  7. Cut the J out and glue it onto the other piece of construction paper, you will NEED to do this because the weight of the jelly beans needs to be supported by more than one layer.
  8. Don’t forget to pop this on your fridge and point to it often and ask your child why in the world there are jelly beans on the fridge! I bet they’ll tell you because J is for jelly bean!

Song!

5 Little Jelly Beans!

5 little jelly beans,
I wish I had more,
I ‘ll eat the red one ,
now there are four!

4 little jelly beans,
tasty as can be,
I’ll eat the green one
now there are three!

3 little jelly beans,
Only a few,
Ill eat the pink one
now there are two!

2 little jelly beans,
eating them is fun,
I’ll eat the blue one,
now there’s only one!

1 little jelly bean,
the last one for me,
I’ll eat the purple one,
I’m happy as can be!


Additional Activities!

Click here for easy instructions on how to make an
alphabet fishing game for your little one!

Name That Bug!

Custom Caterpillars!


This is an easy and fun way to practice learning the letters in their names, or you can number the sections and have your preschooler put the numbers in order!
  1. Gather your materials. You will need some constriction paper, something to trace a circle with, crayons or markers, a pipe cleaner, tape , scissors and glue.
  2. Start by tracing and cutting out circles in different color construction paper , you will need one for each letter, and one for the face.
  3. Give your child a full size piece of construction paper and have them color it, they can draw a cool backyard scene or something more abstract!
  4. If your child is able have them write the letters, even if they are messy and too small or to big- it’s more important that they do it if able and it not be perfect than us stepping in and doing it “right”.
  5. If your child is not writing yet, while they color write out the letters, and do a face on the extra circle.
  6. Spread some glue on the background paper.
  7. Pop the letters on.* Sorry no picture, it was an art playdate and I was talking too much and forgot to take a picture of this step !
  8. Bend the pipe cleaner into fun antennae
  9. Tape it to the back of the face circle.
Song!
Herman the Worm

Video


Sittin’ on a fence post chomping on my gum
( chomp chomp chomp)
Playing with my yo yo
woo woo
When along came Herman the worm
And he was THIS big
And I said ” Herman WHAT happened?”
And he said ” I ate my sister! “

The next 3 verses substitute in brother, mother and father.
The final verse is as follows:

Sittin’ on a fence post chomping on my gum
(chomp chomp chomp)
Playing with my yo yo
woo woo
When along came Herman the worm
And he was this tiny
And I said ” Herman what happened?”
And he said ” I burped.”

Books!

” Bugs! Bugs! Bugs!” by Bob Barner is a good book for little ones interested in bugs, but not ready for a full non fiction science book. Various bugs are introduced with a fact about them, and the coolest part of the book is the page with the life size illustrations of all the bugs. The illustrations are bright and fun and the length is perfect for toddlers and young preschoolers.

” Bob and Otto” by Robert O. Bruel is a lovely story about 2 friends who must part ways , in this case because one is a caterpillar who needs to build a chrysalis and the other an earth worm who needs to dig deep into the ground. What I like about this book is that it goes on to explain that the earth worm’s digging is vital for the trees to grow so that the caterpillar can eat the leaves and turn into a butterfly. I like the lesson about how we all play a part!

” The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle is a classic, that most preschool teachers like myself can recite from memory. It really is a fantastic book, not only does it explain the life cycle of a caterpillar/ butterfly it also is useful for lesson about day of the week and healthy eating! It was a childhood favorite of mine and if the fact that he fell asleep holding his ” Pillar” is any indication it is already one of my son’s favorites too!

Letter of the Week T t !

Tower of T !


We eat a lot of cereal at our house, so when I saw both of these boxes waiting to go out to the recycling I started to play with them to see what I could make, I stacked them on each other and my son exclaimed , T ! So that’s exactly what we are going to make , a big T !
  1. Gather your materials. You will need 2 cereal or similar sized boxes, some wrapping paper or other large pieces of paper,tape ,glue, scissors and some paint and some fun paintbrushes!
  2. Before sitting your child down , wrap the boxes in the paper , make sure it’s inside out, so they have a blank canvas to paint on. I use old wrapping paper I am sick of but anything will do.
  3. Start painting. I am having my son paint the boxes with this fun brush . When I have larger projects to paint I try to use novel brushes to keep him interested. Toddlers and young preschoolers are notoriously fickle, one day they love painting , the next it’s a no go. With novel brushes like this one , my chances are good that the activity will be a hit.
  4. Add a second color. Keep Painting!
  5. Paint the second box. Feel free to do whatever you like, you can even use markers or cover it in stickers! Let both boxes dry.
  6. Glue them together Let dry upside down for a few hours, we ran errands, had nap and then it was perfect!

Letter Discovery Box!


The point of a discovery box is to introduce things to your child with a sense of discovery, it makes them feel like they found it. When they pull an object out of the box, ask them what it is, add in that that starts with the letter of the week!

Enthusiasm counts, so get excited and they will be too!All you need is a box and some household things. toys that begin with the letter and if you have any magnetic or foam letters grab those too!To make it harder for older kids you can add in things that do not start with the letter of the week and ask them to decide and make two piles!


Song!

I’m A Little Tea Pot !
I’m a little tea pot,
short and stout,
here is my handle,
here is my spout!

When I get all steamed up,
hear me shout;
” Tip me over, and pour me out!”

Book!



” Alphabet City” by Stephen T. Johnson is a fascinating take on an alphabet book. The alphabet is found in different places in the city, like a fire escape, and the rose window of a church. Children love trying to find the letters and adults will too! The most amazing part of this book is that the pictures are actually illustrations, they look crisp and clear like photographs but aren’t. Awesome , Amazing and definitely worth checking out!


Fishing For Letters Game


alphabet activity

This fishing for letters game was a favorite in my classroom and is really easy to make. Tuck those kids in , grab some scissors and start cutting, by morning you’ll have a fun game to play with your kids!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need multiple colors of card stock or sturdy construction paper, a marker, scissors, eyelets and an eyelet setter ,or you can also use paper clips!
  2. Draw a fish to make a template. Make sure the tail is large enough to write a letter on it. Cut it out and use this to trace all the fish.
  3. Start tracing the fish on your card stock/construction paper. I normally trace one for every two fish.
  4. Get comfy on your couch, and cut! Layer two or three pieces of paper to make it go faster but be careful , the paper can shift.
  5. Add a letter on the tail and a smile too. If you are using paper clips add an eye too!
  6. If you are using the eyelet option, add the eyelet as the eye for each fish. The eyelet should be magnetic, double check though since some are so heavily coated with paint the fishing pole may not pick them up!
  7. I am using a fishing rod that came with a Melissa and Doug puzzle but you can easily make one with a chop stick, ruler or blunt knitting needle. Add some yarn or ribbon with a strong magnet on the end and you are set!
  8. Wake your baby ( aren’t they always our babies? ) and show them the new game!


Additional Activities

Click here for more Under The Sea themed activities!

Letter Of The Week ! H h!

Happy Heart
H !


My son is smitten with hearts right now so this was an easy way to harness his interest while doing a fun letter of the week project. Using all different color hearts this doesn’t end up looking like a valentine, but does reinforce the letter and the shape!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some fun scrap paper or construction paper to make the hearts, 2 full pieces of construction paper , glue , scissors , markers and a heart shaped paper punch. You can cut out the hearts individually too, especially if you are doing this with an older child who can cut their own , or have a helpful older sibling willing to help!
  2. Draw a Fat uppercase H.
  3. Have your child color with markers or crayons. Th not only stretches out the activity a little it gives them practice for early writing skills. Don’t worry if they say they are done after one scribble, that’s normal, offer another color and if it’s a no go move on.
  4. Cut out the hearts ,I used a punch but feel free to draw hearts and cut them out.
  5. Spread the glue.
  6. Spread the hearts!
  7. Let dry.
  8. Cut out and glue onto another sheet of construction paper. This helps the shape of the letter stand out and makes it less likely to rip.

Books!


I don’t often use books that start with the letter of the week because they don’t usually reinforce the sounds and letter really obviously. However this week I am because all three of these books do it well!

“Horns to Toes And In Between” by Sandra Boynton is a fantastic little book. There are lots of great H words featured, and they are all written in uppercase which for children first learning to recognize letters is a great things since they rarely learn both the lower and upper case at once. Sandra Boynton is a master at great little books, if you aren’t familiar with her books, take some time at the library and check them out!

” Hungry Harry “ by Joanne Partis is a cute book about a hungry little frog out searching for his first meal on his own! This is a fun book to read to children learning their letter sounds since it is easy to exaggerate the sounds in Hungry and Harry. It’s a fun story too!

” Bob’s Busy Hammer” by Kiki Thorpe is the rare character book you will find in my library. In my opinion I would rather a child read character books than nothing but in general these books are the white bread of children’s literature.popular but have no substance. That said this book is great for 2 reasons, it doubles as a hammer and for a child learning about H words, a book in the shape of a hammer reinforces the letter and sounds in a novel way.