Valentine’s Day Rainbow Wall

valentine heart muralWe needed some extra happy cheer in our playroom after a week of cold, gloomy weather. My kids had fun making something cheerful for their playroom while working on fine motor skills, color recognition and counting. Oh and cooperative projects like these were always the very first thing I’d set up for my class ( and now my kids) when bickering started popping up. Working together has a great way of allowing them to work out their differences and feel like a team again.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some contact paper ( or craft paper with double stick tape ) , many sheets of all different color paper, a heart punch, and markers in every color of the rainbow.valentine's day rainbow craft
  2. Start by pinning the contact paper to the wall sticky side out. I prefer contact paper because it allows kids to change where they put a heart if they don’t like their original placement. I pop the paper on with the backing still on then peel. I find it way easier than putting in on with the sticky already exposed. valentines day rainbow
  3. Next punch out a whole bunch of hearts. My kids helped with some but I did most of the punching . valentine's day rainbow craft mural
  4. Draw the rainbow with markers directly on the contact paper.valentine rainbow mural
  5. Set up a heart station ( ours was a plate and a stool) by the contact paper.valentine's day rainbow activity for kids
  6. Let them at it.valentines' day color matching activity for toddlersMy daughter liked taking her time finding the exact right spot for each heart. My son liked gathering a handful of one color and adding them on in a bunch.valentines' day heart mural for kids Clearly they weren’t having any fun at all.valentines' day heart mural for cooperative play
  7. My daughter fizzled out about half way through, if I was making this for just toddlers I’d make a much much smaller rainbow and maybe larger hearts as well. My son and I had a race to see which colors could be filled in first. I was reminded how much I love just working on something like this with my kids. It really does make you feel more like a team and is by far the number one reason we do projects together. He counted each color to see which won and noticed that of course the first few colors would have more than the last few. I love it when learning like that comes so naturally in a self directed way.valentine's day heart mural counting
  8. All done. Now our gloomy winter weather can’t bring us down. Valentine's day heart mural for preschool

Rainbow Painting – Simple Summer Crafts

kids craft rainbowRainbows make people happy even if they don’t look exactly like a rainbow. This simple art project was easy to set up and my daughter and I had fun painting rainbows using combs instead of paint brushes. It was the perfect short little craft to reconnect with her after returning home from a weekend away. When I suggested we paint rainbows she went running for the playroom and pointing out that she was already wearing a rainbow shirt. Clearly it was meant to be.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need paint in rainbow colors , a dish , combs ( bought at the dollar store) andpaper. painting project for kids
  2. Pour the paint into the dish making sure it’s in the right order. Red , orange, yellow, green , blue and purple.
  3. Dip in the comb.
  4. Spread! I just let her explore using the teeth and the back of the comb.
  5. I think the end result was awfully awesome.
  6. The others were made by my bigger hands , going back and forth a few times using both sides of the combs. It was fascinating to watch the colors spread and when I made one she was enthralled. ” Make ‘nother rainbow Mama!” so I did.

Want some more rainbow ideas?  We have a bunch more rainbow projects for you here !

 

 

Rainbow Crafts For Kids

theme for daycare

I love rainbow crafts and with St. Patrick’s Day fast approaching they seem to be one of the more popular searches on my site right now. Even if you aren’t celebrating St.Patrick’s Day rainbows are great preschool crafts for kids. To make it easier for you I rounded them all up so you can find what you need easily when it’s time to add a little color to craft time .

Pom Pom Rainbow Wreath
Rainbow Gelatin Sensory Tub
Color Wheel Match
Scrap Paper Rainbow
Rainbow Color Match
Trash Rainbow Collage
Rainbow Discovery Bottle
Marshmallow Rainbow
Rainbow R Letter Craft
End Of The Rainbow – St. Patrick’s Day Treat Bags

Rainbow Gelatin Sensory Tub

rainbow gelatin sensory tub

I know tomorrow is Valentine’s Day but my mind is already planning St.Patrick’s Day. If you need a Valentine’s Day craft idea we have those too but I had to share this because it was too much fun to keep to ourselves any longer. The major bonus of this project was that for toddlers who are putting everything in their mouths it’s no biggy if they take a bite. I added koolaid to make it smell great and sour to discourage eating it. This must be kept in the fridge so make some , you won’t regret it.

  1. Gather your materials. I used 6 foil pans I had on hand but any container will work to set the gelatin, you will need plain gelatin packets 4 per color, food color, spoons, a pot, measuring cups and koolaid for scent/added color. Also a big tub and some bath toys for playing.rainbow gelatin sensory tub
  2. Start by mixing your colors. I used koolaid mostly for scent but also for color.
  3. Make the gelatin. I used the recipe on the back of the knox gelatin box adjusting it to  1/2 as much liquid ( 1/2 cup of cool and 1 cup hot and 4 envelopes of gelatin) as the recipe called for to make it thicker for play using plain water with color/ koolaid in it. I made all 6 colors.rainbow gelatin sensory tub
  4. Let cool – I had to stack them in my fridge so I popped a few in the freezer for a minute to stiffen and totally forgot about this purple one… if froze, and was unusable. The kids didn’t miss it at all.
  5. When set slice into pieces. I used a knife then scraped it into the tub using a spatula.
  6. Add kids and toys. He was so excited he was bouncing, this is the best picture of many very blurry bouncy pictures I took.Rainbow Sensory Tub
  7.  You can probably tell we did this in our bathroom, please find a place where tiny bits of color won’t ruin anything. The gelatin won’t stain hands but can be absorbed into clothes and other fabrics. Please go somewhere where kids can have fun without you hovering and you won’t have to search for stain removers on Pinterest after this project. Our bathroom was perfect, I had a damp cloth handy for little bits that got shaken off hands or toys and flung all over. It also had a door to stop kids from running into the rest of the house before hands were washed. All this said it was still completely worth it.

    Rainbow Sensory Tub

  8. They stuck them on the side of the tub.
  9. Smelled it. Rainbow Sensory Tub
  10. Tasted it ( love my son’s face, he’s telling her not to eat it). Rainbow Sensory Tub
  11. Mixed them all up and had a blast. Rainbow Sensory Tub

Matching Rainbow

by Katy

This post is about a learning activity I did with my son, Charlie, but it’s also about working with special needs kids in general and how sometimes you might have to look at something differently to get the desired result. I wanted to share this activity with you all because it involved some problem solving, but in the end it was completely worth it. Working and teaching a special needs child can have it’s challenges, but when you can it right, you’re on top of the world.

For this activity we used:

  • A piece of poster board or card stock
  • markers
  • colored dot stickers (Available on the stationery aisle almost anywhere)

For this activity, I wanted to do something with a rainbow and colors. After spotting some “dot stickers” on the stationery aisle, I knew exactly what I wanted to do.

I drew a rainbow with a black marker on half a sheet of poster board. I then used those markers to color it myself–my son hates markers. Did spend a lot of time on it–just enough to make it very clear where each color should be.

We then took out the stickers and began places the stickers in the matching section of rainbow.

We started off guiding Charlie through the motions, waiting for him to start initiating some himself, but we weren’t getting a whole lot out of him. Then my husband remembered that Charlie has gotten very interested in other people’s hands–he likes to touch them, move them around, etc. So we switched things up. My husband held the sticker and asked Charlie where he should put it. Charlie immediately grabbed my husband’s hand and moved it to the correct place.

He did this nine times in a row–until it was clear to both of us that he had no trouble understanding matching. We were so excited to see that he not only understood the activity, but that he was pretty good at it too!

Working with a special needs child sometimes forces you to think outside of your comfort zone–consider different ways. Would it be great if my son could do this activity with no help from his parents? Of course, but in the mean time I want to keep stimulating his brain until his body catches up.

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Katy is a mom of one who loves art, mystery novels, and anything involving peanut butter–she blogs about raising her little miracle at Bird on the Street.