Indian Corn Mosaic Craft

by Kim

 

This craft is fast to set up and fun. It can be easily modified depending of the supplies you have on hand, too. Plus, nothing says fall like Indian Corn.

You will need a piece of paper (I used construction paper), self adhesive craft foam, scissors, and a marker. You can use non0adhesive craft foam or even construction paper. You will just need to have some glue, too.

Draw a shape that generally resembles an ear of corn. No artistic ability is needed, as you can see. Then draw so horizontal lines inside the ear of corn.

Cut the foam into small squares. It does not have to be exact, just the general size of the space between your lines that you drew inside the ear of corn.

Let your child start sticking away! There is no rhyme or reason to this. You can encourage them to keep the pieces in the rows you drew. You could also use this craft to explore color patterns. We chose to just make the colors random. I did instruct them to try their best to keep the squares in the rows.

This craft was great for fine motor skills. Little fingers had to peel the sticker backs off. If you are using regular foam or construction paper, just make a line of glue inside the row and have you child affix the squares. I would suggest doing just one row at a time.

Once you are done, you have a genuine ear of Indian corn.

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Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It.

Clothespin Teaching Turkey

by Katy

For this activity you will need a paper plate, clothes pins, brown and yellow construction paper, scissor, glue, and something to color with. For some reason I had craft confusion and used paint and markers, but that’s overkill.

First, make your paper plate brown–we finger painted because that allows us to work on sensory stuff at the same time. I’m seeing major progress in that my son will paint and also that he’s stopped trying to put the paint in his mouth. Little victories!

Next, cut out a head and beak from the construction paper. Glue them to the plate.

Then you need to color your clothespins. I used markers and did it myself since it’s a little beyond Charlie’s abilities. If your child can do it by themselves, then let them.

Now, for the fun part!

The clothespins become the turkey’s feathers. Use the feathers to do a variety of activities. For us, we were working on identifying colors. You could also do patterns

Since this was our first time doing the activity, we started with only two clothes pins and asked Charlie to select “red” or “blue.” Trying to grab the clothespins has the added bonus of being fine motor practice, but if he’s not able to squeeze properly, they still come off with a tug. If your child has trouble with fine motor, be sure to place the pins far apart to make it easier.

When Charlie correctly identified the blue pin and threw it on the floor, we called it a day!

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Katy is a mom of one who loves art, mystery novels, and anything involving peanut butter–she blogs about raising her little miracle at Bird on the Street.

Favorite Thanksgiving Crafts

Did Thanksgiving sneak up on you? This month has flown by but thankfully we have a bunch of great crafts from years past to highlight.  Here is a collection of some of my favorite Thanksgiving kids crafts. Try to carve out some time this coming week to make something fun with your kids.

Foam Hand Print Turkey

Native American Headdress

Thankful Box

World of Thanks Wreath

Thankful Garland

Simple Thanksgiving Craft

I am thankful for the time I have spent crafting, painting and creating with my son. Today’s thanksgiving craft asks kids to show us what they are thankful for by drawing a picture, and then making a fall fringe frame . This is a great opportunity to practice patterns and/ or counting and if mess makes you squirm using double stick tape will take care of that!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some white paper or construction paper, orange, red, brown and yellow construction paper, a paper cutter or scissors, crayons and double stick tape.
  2. Start by giving your child the paper and crayons ( or markers, pencil crayons or even paints) and ask them to draw a picture of what they are thankful for.
  3. While they draw cut the colored construction paper into small strips.
  4. If your child can’t write yet ask them to tell you about their picture and label it for them. My son is thankful for hot chocolate and his sister, mostly just hot chocolate though!
  5. Add double stick tape to all the edges. 
  6. Start adding the strips. My son wasn’t in a patterning mood so we counted to 51  ( his most favorite number!) and then I added the rest. Interestingly enough the straightest sections were done by him. As you probably know adding these little strips are also a good fine motor workout.
  7. Simple but meaningful!