Football Craft

 

When I celebrated my first American Thanksgiving I discovered that pilgrims and Indians may be the historical symbols of the holiday but football is the down home one. So during a play date with a fellow football fan we made these fun footballs.
  1. Gather your materials. You will need 1 brown paper grocery bag, some newspaper, a stapler, some white paper, glue , scissors and brown paint or markers.
  2. Draw two footballs on the grocery bag, do not cut out.
  3. Have your child color or paint the foot ball brown. Let dry.
  4. While they do that , cut out 2 thick stripes , one think line and 6 short rectangles out of the white paper . These will be the laces and bands on the ball. I have a bunch in the photo because I had two little men making footballs!
  5. Hand your child some newspaper and start crumpling it into balls. Both boys were not into crumpling the paper, which surprised me, maybe they are still young, older kids love it, just watch out a few newspaper balls normally end up in the air!
  6. Time to glue, I usually put the glue on so my son knows where to put the laces and bands.
  7. Cut the football out and start stapling, don’t staple it all the way though.
  8. Stuff the newspaper in
  9. Now staple it all the way!

Books!

” Touchdown : My Football Book” by David Diehl is a short, to the point and completely entertaining little book. It explains so much about football in the absolute easiest ways. My son has started to show a love of football, helmets and tackling and this book is a great injury free way to harness that love!


” T is for Touchdown : A Football Alphabet” by Brad Herzog is a beautiful book that will delight even those of us who are never happy to see football season start. I admit even being an anti fan this book was fun and really full of information that even a football scrooge like myself can appreciate. Also it’s easy to read simply the letters and look at the pictures for little ones and has genuinely interesting blurbs for each page for older children.

Potato Print Turkey Craft For Kids

 

potato print turkey craft for thanksgiving

 

I thought I had had my fill with turkeys for this year until I thought of this, and I had to do it! Feathers are not the easiest art material to use, especially for little fumbly fingers, this craft fixes that! Who needs feathers when you have a good ole potato? If you don’t like potatoes you can try sponges instead, both make cool feather like prints.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 2 pieces of construction paper, one piece of white paper, 1 potato, paint, scissors , a plate, a knife, a marker and glue.
  2. Start by drawing a turkey body shape ( think of a bowling pin) .
  3. Cut the potato in 2 lengthwise.
  4. Have your child paint the turkey using the potato. Let dry.
  5. Next get out some pretty colors and using the fresh half of the potato, I had to cut my potato into a spear because it was too big.
  6. Start printing in a ark to make the feathers, my son at this point only wanted to do markers , but I can tell you if he had done it it would have been much more abstract, which is perfect! Let dry.
  7. Cut the feathers out, here is where you can shape them into feathers if your potato prints were all over.
  8. Draw a face on the turkey and cut out.
  9. Glue the feathers onto the 2nd piece of construction paper.
  10. Glue the turkey body on and add some legs with a marker.

 

Pumpkin Printing for Toddlers & Preschoolers

pumpkin printing for toddlers I had the pleasure of having our neighbor over for craft time today and wanted to show how the same craft can be done differently for a toddler, a 4.5 year old and one done by an adult. So often we think toddlers can’t do the same things as older siblings, or vice versa but easy little add ons or subtractions make all the difference. This pumpkin printing project is perfect for fall.

  1. Gather your materials. I totally forgot to take a picture! ( I am beyond sleep deprived , my son is getting 2 year molars and demanding mommy, and ONLY mommy multiple times a night! ) phew I feel better. Okay back to the materials, a plate, a mini pumpkin, some cool fall colored paint, construction paper and markers.
  2. Cut your mini pumpkin in half.Clean out or have your child if they are old enough clean out the seeds.Halloween craft
  3. Spread a mixture of paint on a plate.pumkin craft
  4. Use the pumpkin as a stamp and press onto the paper. Our guest had a great time making prints and carefully pressing the pumpkin down.
  5. My toddler had a blast using the pumpkin more like a brush and pressing it all around the paper.pumpkin craft
  6. After you are done printing you can add stems and leaves to the pumpkins with markers. My toddler skipped this step and his masterpiece looked like this  but my neighbor added a few to his prints!
Hopefully this helps illustrate how even if the outcome is a little varied all ages can participate in the same activity and have fun doing it!

Turkey Baster Painting

Thanksgiving arts and crafts for toddlers Before you gather all your tools to make the perfect turkey , grab your bulb baster and some paint! This was a ton of fun, and a huge mess. A tip for after you are done, pop your child and the turkey baster into the bath that way you wont have the tedious task of cleaning the paint out of it before using it next week. All the paint will come out in the bath and you can pop it in the dishwasher after that!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need paint, a little water, something to hold it , a dish towel, paper, a piece of construction paper and of course a turkey baster.
  2. Thin the paint a little with water, just a tiny bit though if it’s too thin it will splatter everywhere, and I mean everywhere. Test it out before handing it to your child.
  3. Dip the baster in and start. I showed my son how to do it once and off he went, he alternated between actually using it as a baster and just dipping the tip in and onto his paper.
  4. Try a second or third color! I only made 3 colors because it uses a fair amount of paint up, but there is no reason to not use more if you want. Keep going !My son made 5 pictures- although by the end his fingers were used a bit more than the baster.
  5. Let dry and tape to a piece of construction paper for the complete masterpiece look!
Books!
“I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More!”by Karen Beaumont is guaranteed to entertain your child, even my toddler was laughing and anticipating the rhyming text which tickled me to no end! Now I have had some parents in the past not be happy about the use of “ain’t ” and the little boy in the story painting everywhere, I would counter that by saying people do use “ain’t” and kids do paint on things they aren’t supposed to you can use this as an example of what you aren’t supposed to do, and ask your child what they think should happen if they painted all over the house? As far as using “Ain’t” I would play the traditional “It ain’t gonna rain no more” and explain that the author used that song as inspiration for the book.“Willow” by Denise Brennan Nelson is another wonderful book about artistic spirit. Willow doesn’t follow the rules in art class, instead she paints what she sees when she closes her eyes. Her teacher’s rules are unfair, restrictive and she is just plain mean! It’s hard as a teacher to read stories with mean , repressive teachers in them, and this one takes the cake. Willow doesn’t stop painting blue apples and is confident in her individuality and isn’t as bothered by her mean teacher as I am. This story is really worth a look!