How To Make Juice Box Crayons

recycled crayonsRecycled crayons are fun to make and you don’t need any fancy molds for these! I decided to take advantage of the back to school prices on crayons and make a fun Halloween treat for my son, using recyclable juice boxes for a mold! Here is how I did it. Oh and you could do this technique with any colors . These chunky crayons are great for toddlers and who doesn’t need more stuff for their toddlers to do?

  1. Gather your materials. You will need crayons, some disposable tin foil muffin liners, a pan, some sparkles if desired , a juice box and your oven.
  2. Set your oven to 250 degrees or lower.
  3. Peel off any paper on the crayons you are using. I am using 6 orange and 3 black crayons.
  4. Break the crayons into smaller pieces and place them in the foil muffin liners- or a small over safe container you don’t mind getting wax all over.
  5. Pop them into your oven and watch carefully, they melt fast.
  6. Cut the top off the empty juice box.
  7. Once the wax is melted, pour one muffin liner full of orange wax into the juice box , put it in the fridge to solidify.
  8. If using sparkles pour them into the black wax now, stir and pop the pan back in the oven .
  9. When the wax is set in the juice box, repeat with the black wax, then the 2nd layer of orange.
  10. Let sit until completely dry.
  11. Cut the juice box and peel off the crayon.
  12. Color using this fun new crayon.

Color Mixing

Color mixing is something so simple but so exciting for young children. The lesson is vital as well, the basic understanding that when you mix two things a third new thing is created doesn’t have to come from a complicated lesson, so grab a few towels and trust me your children will love this!
  1. Gather your materials. You will need some clear or white glass or plastic containers. Food coloring, water , a turkey baster and a thick place mat or towel under the jars.
  2. Start by letting your child get accustomed to using the turkey baster to transfer the water from one container to another. They do make child size turkey basters and sell them at educational stores like Lakeshore learning but I am just using a regular old one.
  3. Next add blue and red to two of the jars and have clear water in the third. Ask about the colors and if your child is old enough, ask them to make a prediction about what will happen if you mix the colors.
  4. Continue with as many color combinations as they want. My son had a blast making green and we re did this experiment 4 or 5 times.
  5. If they are getting frustrated with how slow the turkey baster is encourage them to pour the water into the other jars.
  6. The fun can keep going as long as they are interested, our experiment lasted about 30 minutes which was about 15 minutes longer than I expected!
Books!



” A Rainbow Of My Own” by Don Freeman is a charming story about wanting a rainbow, you may notice that the colors are out of order but I have always used that as a teaching tool in my classes.

” Little Blue and Little Yellow”
by Leo Lioniis a profound book with underlying commentary about race relations while the surface story is about little blobs of color who when squished together turn into one green blob!

Letter of the Week ! I i !

Ice Cream I !

Who doesn’t love ice cream? This activity can help teach the letter I , but it can also be used as a lesson about shapes and a simple math lesson. We only put on one scoop but you can add as many scoops as you can count!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 3 or more pieces of construction paper, crayons, scissors, glue and cotton balls if desired.
  2. Start by drawing a large I . Don’t cut it out yet.
  3. Have your child color and decorate the I, let them know that it’s going to be the cone of an ice cream cone. Ask them about the shapes they normally see on a cone, if they tell you a shape ask them to draw it on the cone. If they aren’t quite there yet, don’t push. It’s more important they are enjoying this activity , then us adults trying to cram in 4000 lessons into one. Go with their flow!
  4. While they are coloring and possibly drawing diamonds or other fun shapes, cut out one or more half circles for the scoops or ice cream. I made my scoop look more like ice cream but if you are using this as shape lesson simply use a perfect half circle.
  5. Cut everything out and glue together. Glue the I on the backing paper first, then the ice cream.
  6. Add more scoops if you want, and you can make the ice cream 3D by gluing on a few cotton balls.
  7. Let dry.
Books!


” Ice Cream , The Full Scoop”
by Gail Gibbons is a fascinating book all about, you guessed it, ice cream. It touches on the history of the tasty treat, how it was made in years past and how it is made today. As someone who once called St. Louis home, I was happy to see it also talks about the very first ice cream cone that debut at the 1904 World’s Fair in good old St. Louis! This book is not for toddlers or young preschoolers, it may even be too long for some 5 and 6 year olds. The delivery is fun with a lot of pictures so even if the whole book is too much, bits and pieces in small does much like ice cream is perfect!

“Manana, Iguana” by Ann Whitford Paul is a great book. It is a re telling of Chicken Little with a fun twist. The sky isn’t falling in this tale, instead Iguana is throwing a fiesta and although her friends say they will help, they all back out. She stands her ground and in the end they learn that you don’t get to have your cake and eat it too! The best part about this book is it’s use of Spanish mixed in with the English text. Small children will pick up on these words quickly and any exposure we as parents can give our children different languages is a benefit to them.

These Jelly Fish Don’t Sting!


Paper Plate
Jelly Fish!

This Jelly Fish was a BIG hit with my little guy, which surprised me because I would have thought he was too young. Of course once we finished it he pulled off all the stingers, but he had fun making it!
  1. Gather your materials. You can use regular paper, paper plates or even coffee filters for the body. We used markers to color the body, but paint, crayons or even stickers, would work just as well. I have extra gif wrap for the stingers but any paper or even ribbons would work.
  2. Decorate! Remember to let your child go to town, color as much or as little as they want. If your child is a quick finisher you can try to do the art along with them and taking your time will likely encourage them to spend more time on it too.
  3. Cut your paper plate in half.
  4. Fan fold your gift wrap or paper for the stingers. Older children can paint or color some paper and help you fold it , with younger or impatient ones I would suggest using a paper like this gift wrap that already has a pattern. Too many steps can be too challenging for little guys.
  5. Cut the folded paper in strips. Attach them to the underside of the paper plate, use glue if your little one can wait to play, tape if they can’t!
Song!


I’m a little fishy , watch me go!
I swim fast and I swim slow.
When the day is over , it’s time to sleep
I swim up high and dive down deep.



Books!



” Fish is Fish “
by Leo Lionni is a fantastic fable about a minnow and a tadpole and how friendships can endure even when the friends change.

” Don’t eat the teacher!” by Nick Ward is a silly book about a shark with a lack of self control, a good book to help teach self discipline.

” Gilbert de le Frogponde : A swamp story.”
by Jennifer Rae is a fun story about a lazy frog who outwits 2 chefs who have come to the swamp looking for a frog to cook!

Do The Robot !

Recycled
Robot !

Kill two birds with one activity! This is a great way to reuse paper grocery bags and encourage your child’s imagination with some fun home made pretend play!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a large brown grocery bag, a marker, some paint, a few pipe cleaners, scissors and stickers if you want. I had a stapler in there but only because I made the head hole HUGE and had to make adjustments.
  2. If like me you have a grocery bag with printing on the outside you will want to turn it inside out. It will make the bag wrinkly but my son didn’t seem to mind one bit.
  3. Cut out large arm openings, you don’t want holes because the bag will rip, instead you will need large openings from the bottom to the shoulder.
  4. Cut a large head opening. Here is should be a hole.
  5. Draw some fun roboty buttons and dials. I asked my son what he wanted and he said “button” as he pointed at my shirt so that’s what we did. There is no wrong way to do this!
  6. Add fun stuff like stickers, or cut out foam shapes, the sky is the limit. We added small star stickers.
  7. Start painting! We used a foam brush because it spreads the paint thin and you will want to have a quick drying robot costume since no child wants to wait to make believe!
  8. Add another color or two!
  9. Add some pipe cleaners for added flair – I threaded them through and bent all the ends so there were no sharp edges. Let the paint dry.
  10. Have fun playing robot!