Sail Boat Craft

 

boat craft

We live by the water and one of my son’s favorite things to do is to jump in the Ergo and check out the boats at the marina. We decided to make our own today. Here is how we did it.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need A paper towel roll, the top of an egg carton, some tissue paper, glue, paint scissors and tape.
  2. Paint the egg carton. We used the dot a art paint, because it goes on with very little mess and had a playdate shortly after art time but any paint will do, just keep it thin so it doesn’t saturate the carton.
  3. Next up the paper towel roll mast!
  4. While your child is painting, cut the tissue paper into a sail.
  5. Glue onto the mast.
  6. Add a layer of tape on top to keep the sail in place. You don’t have to do this but I find tissue paper is so flimsy that I did 3 layers and needed glue on the bottom and tape on top.
  7. Glue the mast onto the boat, I poured a ton of glue and stuck the roll into it. Let dry.
  8. Voila , your boat is beautiful and environmentally responsible!


Books!

” Boats” by Byron Barton is a board book that has been read continually since it came home form the library a week ago. Perfect for toddlers who will appreciate the simple text and bright fun pictures, this book is a great for anyone with a child who like mine screams ” Boat, Dingy! Boat!” whenever they are near water!

” An Island in the Soup “ by Mirelle Levert is an award winning book , and it’s easy to see why. The story follows a little boy who refusing to eat imagines a fantasy world in his bowl of soup, it rains peas and carrots and he encounters a bad fairy but in the end he eats his delicious soup. The illustrations are perfect although the bad fairy’s unibrow is very very frightening!

” Busy Boats” by Tony Mitton is s cute little book that uses cartoony characters to help explain all about boats and how they work. This is a perfect book for children who’s attention isn’t held by a non fiction book, but wants to know more about boats!

Rainy Day Rainbow – Recycled Art

This recycled art project is great because it never really has to be done, also it’s a cooperative project that you and your child or a group can do together. You can make it for St.Patrick’s Day or just to brighten a rainy day with lots of color.
  1. Gather your Materials. For the back of the rainbow I have used some extra wrapping paper but you can use anything, in the past I have used brown grocery bags taped together and it looked great! Glue is great for older preschoolers but if you are worried about the mess or if you have a glue eater ( I know I do! ), try some double stick tape!
  2. Draw a rainbow, it doesn’t have to be perfect or even good, the paper will cover it .
  3. Get scrap paper or if you don’t have that you can color some the colors you want. Then hand the paper to whoever loves to rip things, my 14 month old loved this part of the project.
  4. Decide what order you want and start putting the paper in the arches.
  5. Keep going and going- roll it up and wait until the next rainy day to add more scrap paper to it.
In my classroom a few years ago I used this activity as an alternative to going outside when it was raining, throughout the week we would save scrap paper and on a rainy day add it to our rainbow. The children who were 2-3 loved it and when it was done were very proud when I hung it up where their parents could see it. A long term project is a great experience for little ones, so don’t worry about finishing it in one try!

Construction Sensory Tub

 

I wasn’t going to include this activity on the site but my son’s continual begging to play in the “Dut” convinced me to share it!
  1. Gather your materials. I grabbed an old box we got at Costco but any low edged container will do. I filled it with some crushed rock my husband was using to make us a patio, but sand, mulch or soil will be fine too. I wanted it to be something earthy though since so often we use dried beans and pasta. Then I added some construction vehicles and a shovel and pail.
  2. Encourage your child to fill the pail, dig with the shovel and use the diggers and dozers. In all honesty I had to do nothing to encourage my son, he loved every bit of getting filthy!
  3. Have a bath ready, your little one will need it!

Fun with Fungi !

Mushroom Prints!


I love painting and printing with fun things you can find while grocery shopping , when I saw this huge mushroom at the market I knew half would be eaten and half was going to be sacrificed for art!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a large firm mushroom, make sure it’s fresh so it can stand up to a beating, which means no gills showing. Paint- as many colors as you want , a plate and some paper. I am using the brown paper bag from the store. * You could also use multiple veggies- potatoes, onions, and zucchini make cool prints.
  2. Spread a thin layer of paint on the plate.
  3. Start printing!
  4. Add 2nd and 3rd color of paint and keep going.
  5. Don’t worry if your younger child doesn’t stamp the mushroom so that the outline is clear, they are still having fun and painting with a new tool. Older children should be encouraged but not pushed to do it carefully so that they can see the outline. It’s more important to have fun and be open to learning than making them do it “right” .
Book!

Just one book today, it’s such a gem it deserves it’s own day!


” Eating the Alphabet”
by Lois Ehlert is an alphabet book extrodinare! Wonderful paintings of fruits and vegetables seem ultra simple and it is but somehow the way the author has pieced this simple book together is brilliant. Maybe it’s that children learn about food at the table multiple times a day and feel proud being able to identify not only some of the letters but some of the pictures too! From a teaching standpoint I love that there are both upper and lower case letters on each page! This book will grow with your child, and beware it will also make you hungry!

Letter Of The Week ! H h!

Happy Heart
H !


My son is smitten with hearts right now so this was an easy way to harness his interest while doing a fun letter of the week project. Using all different color hearts this doesn’t end up looking like a valentine, but does reinforce the letter and the shape!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some fun scrap paper or construction paper to make the hearts, 2 full pieces of construction paper , glue , scissors , markers and a heart shaped paper punch. You can cut out the hearts individually too, especially if you are doing this with an older child who can cut their own , or have a helpful older sibling willing to help!
  2. Draw a Fat uppercase H.
  3. Have your child color with markers or crayons. Th not only stretches out the activity a little it gives them practice for early writing skills. Don’t worry if they say they are done after one scribble, that’s normal, offer another color and if it’s a no go move on.
  4. Cut out the hearts ,I used a punch but feel free to draw hearts and cut them out.
  5. Spread the glue.
  6. Spread the hearts!
  7. Let dry.
  8. Cut out and glue onto another sheet of construction paper. This helps the shape of the letter stand out and makes it less likely to rip.

Books!


I don’t often use books that start with the letter of the week because they don’t usually reinforce the sounds and letter really obviously. However this week I am because all three of these books do it well!

“Horns to Toes And In Between” by Sandra Boynton is a fantastic little book. There are lots of great H words featured, and they are all written in uppercase which for children first learning to recognize letters is a great things since they rarely learn both the lower and upper case at once. Sandra Boynton is a master at great little books, if you aren’t familiar with her books, take some time at the library and check them out!

” Hungry Harry “ by Joanne Partis is a cute book about a hungry little frog out searching for his first meal on his own! This is a fun book to read to children learning their letter sounds since it is easy to exaggerate the sounds in Hungry and Harry. It’s a fun story too!

” Bob’s Busy Hammer” by Kiki Thorpe is the rare character book you will find in my library. In my opinion I would rather a child read character books than nothing but in general these books are the white bread of children’s literature.popular but have no substance. That said this book is great for 2 reasons, it doubles as a hammer and for a child learning about H words, a book in the shape of a hammer reinforces the letter and sounds in a novel way.