Paper Bag Frog Craft


  1. Gather your material. You will need a paper lunch bag, some black, green and red construction paper, glue , scissors, a paintbrush and green paint.
  2. Start by cutting a few inches off the bottom of the paper bag, this will make the bag look more like a short chubby frog!
  3. Paint the paper bag with the green paint.
  4. Get more paint and paint the back, and let dry.
  5. While your child is painting cut out two large green circles , and two smaller black ones.
  6. Cut out a long rectangle from the red paper for a tongue.
  7. Glue the black circles onto the green ones to make the eyes.
  8. Roll the red paper tightly to make a curly tongue.
  9. When the bag is dry glue the eyes and tongue on!

Song!


Little Green Frog

Um um! Went the little green frog one day,
Um um , went the little green frog.
Um um went the little green frog one day,
and they all went um um ahhh!

But we all know frogs go ,
la di da di da,
la di da di da
la di da di da
We all know frogs go la di da di da,
They don’t go um um ah!!!


Books!

” Why Frogs Are Wet” by Judy Hawes is good fact filled non fiction book all about frogs. This book is great for the 4-5 year old crowd but the pictures are wonderful for all ages. The text is long so I would suggest reading a few pages at a time . It covers the evolution of frogs, life cycle and more!

” An Extraordinary Egg” by Leo Lionni is a very cute story about three frogs who find a wonderful egg, thinking it must be a chicken egg they are excited to have a new friend when the chicken hatches, even though it’s really an alligator! Kids love this story because they think these are the silliest frogs ever for not knowing that the chicken isn’t a chicken at all!

Earth Day Craft


  1. Gather your materials. For this craft you will need some recycled card board and either news paper or a paper grocery bag, paint, a paint brush, glue and scissors.
  2. Draw a circle and some continents on your cardboard, cut out the circle only.
  3. Paint your newspaper or grocery bag blue using a paint brush and let dry.
  4. Finger paint your continents but wait until they are dry to cut them out, this is because it’s much easier to get toddlers and young children to paint larger things, than small cut out pieces. Let dry.
  5. Wrap the dry blue newspaper around the cardboard round and glue on the back.
  6. Cut out the dry continents.
  7. Glue on and enjoy your recycled world!
Note to Parents: If you are doing this craft with older siblings, you could roll a geography lesson into it as well, tracing the continents from a map so they are accurately shaped and place them properly on the earth!


For additional Recycled Projects Click Here

Books!

Here are just 2 of the many good books out there from children about the environment.

” The Berenstain Bears Don’t Pollute ( anymore) “ by Stan and Jan Berenstain provides an excellent overview of a whole bunch of concerns for our world. It touches on recycling, deforestation, air pollution and more. The text would be far too long for the younger crowd but Pre-K on up would be an appropriate age range.

” The Whole Green World” by Tony Johnston is a celebration of the Earth and it’s beauty. The text is short enough to hold young children’s attention and the illustrations by Elisa Kleven are bright and so detailed you will fall in love! I think it’s important to teach our children to see the beauty of the Earth, especially when we are teaching them to conserve it!

Parent’s Corner: Product Review

Watercolor Crayons!

Pleasantly Surprised!

When I found these watercolor crayons at the local art supply store’s kids corner I thought, these will be fun when my little guy is older, but I will try them out and write a review. When my little guy was refusing a nap this weekend I pulled them out and here is our review.

What I liked :

I liked that the set comes with lots of colors, a paint brush, are non toxic and it was under 5 dollars. The mess level is also very low compared with even traditional water colors.

What I didn’t like:

It takes some strength for the crayons to leave good thick marks that will create lots of color when painted over. The crayons were small so it wasn’t easy for my little guy to hold them, although it wasn’t impossible either. In the picture below you can see a flower I drew worried that he’d get no reaction when the water was brushed over his coloring. He did get some but the saturation is much better when you can press hard with the crayon.

What my son liked:

All of it, he liked coloring with the crayons but he loved getting the paintbrush and dipping it in the water and brushing over the crayons. It only took me showing him once for him to catch on. We sat and did water colors for 20 minutes, I was shocked and elated! Also he loved putting the paintbrush in his mouth and unlike with liquid paint these left NO trace of paint on him.

What he didn’t like :

That mommy wouldn’t let him put his whole hand in the water .


I give this product a great big seal of approval, even though young children will need help to make the crayon marks dark enough to get good color saturation when they paint the water on. This would be a great product to take with you when you are camping or traveling because it really isn’t very messy, it packs up easily and won’t leak in your luggage!

Stay tuned , later this week we will be using these crayons and paintbrush to make a hand painted Thank You note for someone special!

Sponge Painting For Toddlers

sponge painting for babies and toddlers

Sponge painting is a wonderful way for young children to explore paint, they don’t need to have superior fine motor skills to succeed at making some fun marks on the paper. It’s the perfect toddler art activity.

  1. Gather your materials. For this art activity you will need a regular kitchen sponge, some paint, a paper plate or the like to put your paint on, paper and scissors.
  2. Cut the sponge into some good hand size shapes for your child. We’ve been learning about shapes so I made some , but you can cut out fish shapes, letters..the sky and your cutting ability is the limit!
  3. Spread some paint on a plate or tray and dip your sponge in.
  4. I like to mix colors as we paint, it’s fun and keep the kids interested, as well as asking them what shape or picture they are making with the sponge.

 

Shape Detectives!

Can You Find The Triangle?

This is a fun and easy activity to do with children who are learning their shapes. You can use any shapes according to what your child is presently learning. This however is too sophisticated for toddlers and may be frustrating for some younger preschoolers too. I used it often as a after lunch , before outside time activity with my Pre-K class with great success!

  1. Gather your materials. All you need is some paper and markers. One color for the outline and one color for each shape.
  2. Draw a picture using obvious shapes. I made a house and a sun, but I have also made shape people, snow men, trains and cars- the sky is the limit. I wouldn’t make too many shapes on one sheet though, you want it to be a challenge but if you make it too hard the challenge turns into frustration and you miss the window for learning!
  3. Make a legend clearly stating that each shape has it’s own color.
  4. Explain it to your child/class by either helping them with the first shape or doing a big version of this at circle time on a dry erase board or large poster paper.
  5. Start finding the shapes and coloring them in!

* I would often tell my students that I wasn’t sure which shape was which and I needed help and then ask them to be my detectives! Also if you are doing this for a class, make one black line master and photocopy the rest, then simply make color dots on the legends.