Easy Easter Egg Collages

Collage Easter Eggs

 


This activity allows children to experience how different materials work with glue and paper. Although simple to adults, children can learn many things about texture, thickness and any other attributes that the chosen materials have. Don’t limit yourself to tissue paper, use ribbon, rice, dried beans or pasta even. Older children can even make patterns !

  1. Gather your materials. I used 2 different thicknesses of paper ( tissue and card stock) , and a number of different ribbons for this egg. Having a small toddler I stayed away from pasta and beans since they can present a chocking hazard when uncooked. For the egg I used card stock, and of course you will need glue.
  2. Cut out a large egg shape out of card stock, or cardboard.
  3. Spread on some white glue.
  4. Start the masterpiece! While your child is placing the materials on the egg you can ask them about what they are doing, ask how the material feels, if it will need a lot or just a little glue to stick on , what color and shape it is… but remember not everything has to be turned into a parent/teacher directed learning experience. If your child thrives on this interaction go for it , but if they thrive on individual creative play, let them take what they need from this activity and follow their lead.
  5. Glue the egg on a large piece of paper if you want for a more finished look.

 

Song!


5 Little Jelly beans.

5 little jelly beans,
I wish I had more,
I ‘ll eat the red one ,
now there are four!
4 little jelly beans,
tasty as can be,
I’ll eat the green one
now there are three!3 little jelly beans,
Only a few,
Ill eat the pink one
now there are two!2 little jelly beans,
eating them is fun,
I’ll eat the blue one,
now there’s only one!
1 little jelly bean,
the last one for me,
I’ll eat the purple one,
I’m happy as can be!


Books!


While traditionally Easter is a Christian celebration, more and more non religious people are celebrating the Easter Bunny with their children. That trend in mind I have only one religious book in my recommendations, the other two are simply bunny themed.

” What is Easter” by Michelle Medlock Adams is a easy to understand book about why people celebrate Easter. She explains that it’s not because of the Easter Bunny or the fun egg hunts either, that the death and resurrection of Jesus is what Christians are celebrating . Great book for those who observe the holiday.

” That’s not my bunny, it’s tail is too fluffy!” by Fiona Watt carries on the theme of the art project , exploring the sense of touch with all different textures. Great for the under 2 crowd!

” Knuffle Bunny” by Mo Willems is hilarious and heartwarming all at the same time. The story is about a lost bunny, and a dad that can’t quite understand what his toddler is trying to “say” to him. Luckily the mom speaks ” toddler” and dad gets to be a hero by reuniting his daughter with her beloved bunny.

You’ve got mail !

DIY Postcards

Who doesn’t love to get mail? Making their own postcards then sending them to themselves is a fun way to introduce the concept of the mail to your child. For teachers this is a great activity for a community helpers unit.

  1. Gather your materials. I used a black card cut in two but you can just use any heavy paper cut into the size of a post card. You will need some art materials to decorate your postcard too. I am using blue painters tape to tape over the area to put both the address and return address on.
  2. Go nuts decorating the front of the post card.
  3. Flip and decorate the back too!
  4. Remove the tape, and address the postcard .
  5. Stick on a stamp and pop it in the mail.

If you are doing this with more than one child or doing more than one post card you can record how long it takes your post card to return to you, or to get to whoever you send it to.

Song!


In the mailbox, In the mailbox
look and see, look and see,
a package or a postcard,
a letter from my grandma
just for me, just for me!

In the mailbox, in the mailbox,
look and see, look and see,
a magazine that’s dandy
a valentine with candy,
just for me , just for me !

Book!



A fantastic book about letter writing is ” Dear Mrs. LaRue letters from Obedience school ” by Mark Teague. The story is a humorous look at Ike’s time at obedience school and how his perception of the hardships he is facing is a little different from reality.

No Mess Color Mixers


This is a fast and fun activity that can be done with almost any age.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need one ziplock per child and a few colors of paint.
  2. Pour the paint into your bag , flatten as much air out as you can, and then seal it.
  3. If you want to make the lesson about color mixing you can wait and add in another color after playing with the first color for a while, asking your child if they know what color it will turn into.
  4. You can make letters, numbers and pictures too. Remember to ask your child how it feels, is it cold, soft? squishy?
  5. For added fun you can put different colored paper under your ziplock and the designs will be more colorful!

* You may be wondering why my little model isn’t doing this activity. I did let him play with it but all he wanted to do was chew the bag- trust me though the preschool classes I have done this with love it! You may just want to avoid doing it with toddlers who are cutting teeth! *

Books!

These two authors are childhood favorites of mine, as sentimental as these two books are to me they are also perfect for the theme at hand!

” A Rainbow Of My Own” by Don Freeman is a charming story about wanting a rainbow, you may notice that the colors are out of order but I have always used that as a teaching tool in my classes.

” Little Blue and Little Yellow”
by Leo Lioni is a profound book with underlying commentary about race relations while the surface story is about little blobs of color who when squished together turn into one green blob!

Flower Power!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some paper, a marker, some paint, a cupcake liner and some glue.
  2. Draw or have your child draw the outline of a flower and a stem on two separate pieces of paper.
  3. Spread some paint either directly on the paper or in a small plate and start finger painting, be prepared for paint on clothes, and in the mouth with young ones , make sure it’s non toxic!
  4. Switch paper and do the stem. I used colored paper but there is no reason not to use white.
  5. Let the paint dry and cut along the marker outline.
  6. Glue the flower onto another piece of paper and glue a cup cake liner in the middle of the flower for a finishing touch!

** What I like about this activity is that it gives your child a chance to explore the paint freely and then see how it can create a flower. Most preschoolers I have done this craft with asked to make another finger painting after we set the flower pieces up to dry! **

Song – sing it to the tune of “I’m a little tea pot”.

I’m a little Daisy
Tall and Slim
Here are my petals and here is my stem
When the sun comes up
and the rain comes down
I grow and grow up from the ground!

ABCs and 123s

Polka Dot Discovery
I have done this activity for years and never once called the eggs Easter eggs, they were polka dots with surprises inside. Obviously if you celebrate Easter there is no reason to call them anything else but if you don’t celebrate Easter you can still jump on the polka dot bandwagon and use them to have fun learning.
  1. Gather your materials. You will need some plastic eggs that open with room to hide things inside, you can also use small gift boxes. Some paper, a marker, some scissors and basket or bag.
  2. The great thing about this activity is that it’s versatile. If you are learning about shapes you can pop shapes in the eggs, if you are doing letters you stuff them with letters etc… So this next step is where you decide what to stuff them with and using a marker and paper make the surprises.
  3. Stuff the eggs and either hide them for a hunt, or place them in a basket for your child to choose from.
  4. When you child finds the egg make sure to ask them what color the outside is, and encourage them to open it up and find what’s inside.
  5. If your child is a young toddlers you can simply put fun toys in and they will be kept busy finding them. Just opening the eggs are great fine motor skills practice!
  6. One last note if you have an older sibling who is working on sight words at grade school you can pop those in some eggs for them too!

Egg Carton Number Match!

This is NOT an activity for toddlers, the pieces are small and a choking hazard
  1. Gather your materials. You will need the bottom of an egg carton, some mini cupcake liners, some paper, a marker and a paper punch.
  2. Write the numbers 1-12 on the inside of the liners, you don’t NEED the liners but it’s much easier than writing it on the egg carton directly. If your child is able have them write the numbers.
  3. Place the liners in the egg carton.
  4. Punch our your desired shapes with a paper punch. If you don’t have one handy you can cut out small shapes.
  5. Count as you fill the cup cake liners.
Activity ideas

Now that you have made your tools here are some fun things you can do with it, depending on your child’s abilities.

1. With the cups filled , pull one liner out and count the pieces inside , ask your child if the number at the bottom is the same as they counted.

2. Empty out all the pieces and ask /help your child to fill them up, do this out of order for an extra challenge.

3. Take the liners and pieces out and ask/help your child put them back in the right order.