Naptime Creation – for older children!

Table Manners
Place Card Holder
I fondly remember making place cards for my mom when guests came over , this simple place card holder can be adapted to any occasion, use a sprig of pine for Christmas, or some glittery berries for new years! Also for the kids table you can make the Foam Turkey and glue a clothes pin to the back! This is also a great way to practice penmanship which doesn’t get much action these days! Even if you aren’t hosting a big holiday dinner making some place cards is a great way to involve your children in setting the table!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some dried grass, or other fall foliage, glue, cardstock, paper cutter if available, scissors, clothes pins, fine tipped marker , gliter glue , hole punch and ribbon.
  2. Start by cutting out an oval with scissors or cheat with a paper cutter like me! I am using brown blank note cards , I liked the color and the weight is perfect for the project.
  3. Using a hole punch , punch two small holes in the oval.
  4. Thread a piece of ribbon through , use a longer piece than you think you will need, trust me it’s easier to cut off extra than re thread it.
  5. Add a little dab of glue where the main part of your foliage will be. If you are making this sans kids use hot glue it will be way faster and sturdier.
  6. Add fall foliage , tie a bow.
  7. Add glue to a clothes pin, don’t add as much as I did, it took forever for mine to dry!
  8. Pop your oval on, let dry.
  9. While that dries cut a 2nd oval out, write the name of a guest and decorate , I chose to do simple dots of glitter glue.
  10. When dry put it together! Remember you can pop different name in for next year, or if you have a change in the guest list. Your placecard will stand on it’s own, i just couldn’t get a good picture!

Rememberance Day

Take time today to think of all those who have been touched by war, it is always a hard subject to teach about no matter the age of the student but politics aside we can all teach our children to respect the sacrifice that service men and women make . This poem was used year after year in my education and I want to share it with all of you today. See below for another great activity to honor the men and women of the armed forces – and it practices the dying art of letter writing too!

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Lt.-Col. John McCrae

For more information on this poem
click here


~ Write to a Soldier ~


For Canadian Troops:
Click Here

For American Troops :
Most letters to the troops programs have been suspended due to security regulations, however I found this:
Click Here

Bubble Wrap Indian Corn Craft

thanksgiving craft I have been waiting to do this craft for ages but you will see that even fun projects sometimes don’t appeal to cranky 2 year olds, no biggie, just improvise and everyone will have fun. Although I am doing this as a Thanksgiving craft , you can do this while learning about nutrition, cooking or gardening too!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 2 pieces of paper, a crayon, paint, a piece of bubble wrap, a paint brush, glue and scissors.
  2. Draw 2 ears of corn on a yellow or white piece of construction paper.
  3. Mix some paint on a plate, and dip the bubble wrap in it, I blotted it in paper towel first. This was as much as my son would do with the wrap, right after I took this picture I got told ” No , no brush, pease” .
  4. If your child likes bubble wrap have them press the bubble wrap on their corn. My son used a paint brush instead. I did a bubble wrap one though, so you can see the results below ! Let the corn dry.
  5. When your child is painting with bubble wrap or a brush, draw some husks on the 2nd piece of paper.
  6. Have your child paint it brown with a paint brush, as you can see my son was all over this step! Let everything dry.
  7. Cut out the corn – you can see that as cool as the bubble print corn is the one my son made is just as wonderful, so don’t stress if your child goes “off book” it’s all good! It looks almost like he used the wrap in places but it was all dotting with the brush.
  8. Cut out the husks, if your child can use scissors let them do the cutting, and glue to the top of the corn.

Letter of the Week ! Q q !

Queen Q!

I debated doing Queen, because it’s so obvious but my son knows what a queen is so I stuck with it. With older children drawing a bunch of question marks or doing a counting activity with quarters are great ways to use the letter in genuine ways. One thing I do not suggest is a Q-tip q, I did that years ago in a PreK class and the results looked like we glued used q-tips on paper, it was so repulsive my director asked me to take them down off the bulletin board!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 3 pieces of construction paper, paint daubers or crayons/markers, glue, sequins or other collage materials that make good jewels, and scissors.
  2. Draw a upper case Q. It took me 3 tries for one I liked.
  3. Have your child paint. color or otherwise decorate the Q. My son refused to paint it until the other side was completely done. Toddlers are such a joy.
  4. While your child is decorating their queen , cut out a simple crown from the 3rd piece of paper.
  5. Have your child embellish the crown with sequins , buttons – anything you have that sparkles.
  6. While your child is making the crown sparkle. Draw a face ( or have your child do it) on the other piece of paper. Make sure it is will show through the inside of the Q.
  7. Have your child color the face if they want. My marker obsessed toddler insisted on coloring but you don’t have to.
  8. While they do that cut out the Q.
  9. Glue the Q on the paper, and the crow on the Q and voila , a Queen Q ! Once it’s dry you can trim the back paper .
Letter Hunt

This activity is great for children who are able to identify letters reliably, younger kids who are still learning the basics of letter recognition may get frustrated. An easy adaptation would be to simply look for any letter with the little guys where as you can be letter specific with older ones.

  • You will need a paper lunch bag, markers, scissors and old magazines, junk mail, or newspapers.
  • Decorate the outside of your lunch bag with the letter you are looking for, both the upper case and lowers case.
  • Start looking through the printed materials and cut out the letters you find. With older children it’s fun to have contests like the person with the most upper case letters, the most letters total and the biggest or smallest letter.

* One thing I love about this activity is that when children are at this stage of letter recognition they start to see the same letter written in different fonts and are still able to identify it as a B for example. It’s great!

We can all be Meteorologists !

Weekend RePost.
This is an old post from February that I added new book reviews and an additional activity to. My little helper is missing because in February he wasn’t able to play with cotton balls without eating them.Have a great weekend , there will be a new post up on Monday!

We are mixing things up today I am talking about a book first because ” It Looked Like Spilt Milk” by Charles G. Shaw goes perfectly with our activity. In the book all different shapes are shown and the children love to tell you what it is, an ice cream cone, a bird… but really they are all clouds! After reading I will ask students if they have ever seen a funny looking cloud and if they would like to make a funny looking cloud!You don’t have to use this book, you could just pop outside and find some clouds and talk about their shapes too!

Cotton Ball Cloud

  1. Gather your materials. I am used cotton balls, some card stock , a marker and white glue. Oh and don’t forget the scissors. If you don’t have cotton balls you can use tissue paper cut up or even toilet paper!
  2. Draw the outline of the cloud, I have made a very boring every day cloud but allow your child to make any shape they want and if they can draw it, let them. I would only draw the outline for very young toddlers.
  3. Cut it out. ( did anyone else have a flashback to Full House right there? )
  4. Put glue all over the cloud , and put on your cotton balls. Even really little guys love this part, but watch them they also love to pop them in their mouths.

Song!

What’s the weather?

What’s the weather ?
What’s the weather like today?
Tell me _(insert kids name)__ what’s the weather,
What’s the weather like today?
Is it sunny?
Is it rainy?
Is it cloudy out today?


Is it snowy?
Is it windy?
What’s the weather like today?
Additional Activity

One of my favorite activities to do with children after reading this story is to take a blue piece of construction paper, and white glue and make fold over clouds. It’s super simple and fast , so you might want to have a few pieces of paper for each child. You simply add white paint to one half of a blue piece of paper, fold , squish and open it up. See if there is a hidden image, we once found a piece of pepperoni pizza in one!

 

Books! 

” Cloudy with a chance of meatballs” by Judi Barrett is a fantastic book for Pre-K and up, if your child has a long attention span I would try it earlier , but the text is long and complicated for most toddlers. My son won’t sit for more than a few pages if I am lucky. The story follows one Grandpa’s tale about the town of Chewsandswallows where the weather comes in the form of food! All was well in Chewsandswallows until the weather took a turn for the worse! I loved teaching with this story, and kids love it too!

” Weather” by Pamela Chanko and Daniel Moreton is the perfect little non fiction book about weather for toddlers and young preschoolers. It’s short and has big interesting photos depicting different weather. Don’t be fooled, it looks like nothing, but trust me little guys will ask you to read it again and again. It’s important that children get read a variety of things, not simply fiction, so don’t be afraid to get your child a simple little non fiction book like this one!

” The Itsy-Bitsy Spider” by My First Taggies Book is a fun little book with the ever popular tags which add an extra level of sensory experience for your little one. The pictures are cute, the rhyme familiar and I liked traveling with this book when my son was little, because of the tags it was a double duty, book and touch toy!