Rhyming Activities For Kids

rhyming lessons for preschool Rhyming is a vital part of literacy development. When children rhyme they play sounds and apply their abilities to new combinations of letter sounds. This is a fun activity for most children but some children really struggle with rhyming. For all kids we should be trying to make this fun. I encourage all parents to rhyme with their kids, it’s an accessible way to work on literacy skills at home and it rarely feels like work!

Here are nine fun rhyming activities for kids to try at home.

rhyming tag cover

 

Rhyming Tag

rhyming rockets done

Rhyming Rockets

find and rhyme game for reading

Rhyming Hide & Seek

rhyming puzzle pieces

Rhyming Puzzle st.patrick's day rhyming treasure hunt

Rhyming Scavenger Hunt

rhyming activity

Rhyming Jars

Rhyming pegboard literacy activity for kids

Rhyming Peg BoardRhyming Tree - Early Literacy Lesson

Rhyming Tree

rhyming activity

Spin & Rhyme

Sight Word Game

sight word gross motor game for kids

It’s been beautiful here and I wanted to get outside for a little learning. This gross motor sight word game is fun and was a cinch to adapt to very different ability levels. My son worked on sight words and my daughter on letter recognition. When we played this the first time my kids were not very into it. It was almost dinner, we’d been busy all week , and it was just bad timing. A few days later we played again and it was a huge hit! Smiles, words being yelled out , letters flying into the pretend recycle bin… so I thought my reminder to myself would be a good reminder for you too. Timing is everything and don’t give up if an activity flops. Give it one more try before giving it the ax.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some ping pong balls, a container, sharpies ,and some painter’s tape if you want to turn your container into a recycle bin like we did. sight word game for kindergarten
  2. Start by writing out sight words and/or letters for your child on the ping pong balls. A quick google search will provide leveled sight word lists for your child.sight word gross motor game
  3. Add the recycle sign on your container.sight words recycle game
  4. We went outside and I pretended to be a litter bug throwing recycling ( the ping pong balls) all over our yard. I really spread them out. The rule was that they had to call out the word/letter before running it back to the bin to clean up the yard.sight word recycling activity
  5. Off they went!  sight word and letter gameThey played well but the next time we played it was all giggles and rushing – you can tell in this picture that my son was tired . He hoarded as many balls as he could then ran up to the bin read them all to me and ran back to get another handful. sight word game readingThe next time he’d find one, run it over and run to the next.  My daughter was overwhelmed with how spread out I made it. The 2nd time we played I kept them in a much smaller space which made a huge difference for her.sight word game for kindergarten and preschool

Books About Recycling For Kids

plasticbottle

The Adventures of a Plastic Bottle: A Story About Recycling by Alison Inches is awesome!  The book takes the reader through the complete process from crude oil, to bottle and then to synthetic fleece. I am not too proud to admit I learned s a few new things and had a few good laughs along the way with the books little bits of humor too. I think most 5 year olds would enjoy this book, and it’s easy to break it down for those unable to sit for this much text.

why do we recycle

Little Pirate: Why Do We Recycle?  by Innovative Kids is a really fun book about recycling with a pirate theme. Yes a pirate theme. Readers learn about recycling, composting and garbage along with two young pirates who need to clean up their ship. The pirates ask questions about different waste and the wise parrot fills them into the facts like the best bag to use while shopping is a cloth one, and what happens to the metal, glass and paper after we put them in the recycle bin.

Gabby and Grandma go green

Gabby and Grandma Go Green by Monica Wellington is another wonderful book from one of our favorite authors. In the book Gabby and her Grandma spend a day together  dedicated to going green. First making a great reusable bag and then using it all around town. I love that they go to the library and that is portrayed as a way to go green as well as a place to learn more about environmental efforts. Also showing ways to make a difference at the grocery store is perfect for young kids who are often tagging a long with parents on these errands. I can’t end the review without also mentioning the baby sibling who is sleeping in a sling at the end of the book , I love seeing baby wearing in books!  This is a great environment themed book that works all year round not just for Earth Day.

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Paint & Read { and sound it out }

learn to readTwo skills children need to master in their journey to independent reading are segmenting and blending sounds. Segmenting is breaking a word apart into individual sounds and blending is very simply the ability to combine the sounds together smoothly. When we tell a child to sound it out , this is really what we are asking them to do.  This activity was designed for my son who is a great reader but who will often read so quickly that if he encounters a word he doesn’t know he simply guesses and continues. If I ask him to sound the word out he will  still often guess and get frustrated at me for asking instead of slowing down and doing it even though he is perfectly capable of doing so.  I had to come up with a playful way that would force him to chill a little, slow it all down and focus on the sounds.  This activity can be adapted for any level even single sounds or sight words. We did a similar one for toddlers exploring letters here.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some white paper, white wax crayon, dark water color ( container is you need one) , a little water and a paint brush. I also used a clipboard to keep the pages secure while painting. reading
  2. Start by writing out the words you want your child to stretch out. I used a book we’ve recently read to help me think of some words. Many of the words I chose were not a challenge to read , the challenge is to get him to slow down and stretch them out. For new readers you will want to do words like cat, dog, ball, map, off, snap etc…  but know that older children and more proficient readers can still work on this skill with more complex words. paint and read early literacy activity for kids
  3. Next I popped the black water color into the jar and added just a little water. To do this well you want a lot of color but not too much water .
  4. I invited my little reader and explained that he needed to paint over the words SLOWLY and read as he went, then to read the whole word normally. I had to emphasize that the goal was not to guess the word after painting over the first few letters, that the right way to do it was to carefully say each sound then put the word back together. paint and read learning to read activity for kids
  5. The activity was an instant hit. paint and read learning to read activity for kindergartenIt really did get him to slow it down and pay attention to all the sounds in the words instead of just guessing. I was happy to find a tool for him to keep working on these skills without making him feel like I was giving him a remedial task.  paint and readQuick activities likes this one can be thrown together easily with some really fantastic benefits to your child’s reading ability. paint and read early literacy lesson for kids

 

Writing Books With Your Child { Guest Post}

Writing Books with Your Child

by Becky Spence { This Reading Mama }

When kids are first learning to read, one of the things they need are some basic sight words under their belt. My son {age 4.5} has learned about 25 sight words this past year through the PreK reading curriculum I created for him. This summer, I want to expand and review that sight word learning without being too structured.

One way we will do this is by composing emergent readers together about him and the things he loves. There are many reasons why this concept works well. For one, it is all about the child. The majority of readers, even reluctant readers, will stick with something longer when the topic is of high interest to them {and what is more interesting to a child than a story about himself?} Secondly, this idea is highly adaptable to meet the developmental needs of the child {most writing activities are}. I will include some of those adaptations at the end of the post. But for now, I want to share how we made our first emergent book of the summer.

Steps to Writing Books with Your Child

Take Photos of Your Child Doing What He Loves | This Reading Mama

1. Ahead of time, I chose the predictable sentence I wanted for this particular book: “I like to…”. {For young readers, predictable text like this works well because of the repetition of words.} I asked him to pick several things he liked to do and he did them. While he was doing them, I took pictures of him. Painting, jumping, playing his favorite bird game, coloring…you name it.

2. I saved all the pictures to our computer. He chose the pictures he wanted to use and I printed them each onto a separate piece of paper to create a book.

3. I modeled the first sentence, “I like to color”. He listened as I talked through my sentence. It’s great for kids to hear us think out loud as we read and write. This is one way they gain the strategies they need to read and write with independence. An example of what I said, “I’m going to start writing over here on the left side of the paper because that’s where you start with reading and writing.” Think basic. Think simple.

Writing Books with Your Child

4. We worked on the other sentences together. “I like to jump.” “I like to play.” And so on. I let him take the lead and write as much as he wanted. When he didn’t want to write any more, I helped out. To keep him active in the writing while I had the pencil, he continued to help me sound out words. Writing books with kids is a great way to model spacing, capitialization, listening for phonemes {sounds in words}, and other foundational reading and writing skills.

5. Once all the sentences were written {this took two days}, we worked on the title page; made from colored construciton paper of his choice. Coming up with a title was a bit tricky for him, so I offered him several choices. He picked, “Things I Like to Do”. He added “by {his name}” to the title page as well.

6. We stapled the book together and he used our recycled bubble wand to read it to me. The book now has a home in his independent reading bin {a bin of books he can read himself, mainly from Reading the Alphabet}. If you don’t have a bin, displaying the books your child has written among the other books on the shelf or in a special space shows him you value his work as a writer.

Adaptations for Writing Books with Your Child

  • Instead of taking photos, ask your child to illustrate the pictures. This works particularly well for those children who love to draw.
  • Adapt the predictable sentence based on the words your child already knows or needs to know. Start simple. Sight words need to be introduced slowly with children just learning to read.
  • Use life experiences to create your sentences. For example, after a trip to the zoo, you could write the predictable sentence: “I saw a…” filling in the different animals your child saw that day.
  • Make it as long or as short as you’d like. Our book was five pages long because that’s all his attention span could handle.
  • Break up the activity into different segments. The entire book does not have to be completed in one sitting. Break it up over a few days, especially if you’re asking your child to do most of the drawing or writing.
  • For children who are not ready to do the writing, do it for them. But require that they be your helper, listening for sounds {phonemes} in words, helping put the space in between words by placing their finger there as a space holder, or drawing the period at the end of the sentence. Sometimes children just aren’t ready to write the entire sentence. Ask them to write the letters they do know how to write.
  • For more advanced readers/writers, mix up the sentences a bit instead of making the book totally predictable. For example, “I like to jump./I can jump very high./I jump the highest on my trampoline.” etc.

Predictable Sentence Starters

As a head-start, here are a few sentence starters that work well for writing predictable books with young readers, based on early sight word lists:

  • The _______.
  • A ______.
  • I see the ______.
  • I see a ______.
  • I can _______.
  • I like _______.
  • I like to ______. {example I used}
  • I saw a ______.
  • I am _______.
  • My _______.
  • Look at the ______.

 

Becky @ This Reading Mama

Becky Spence is a homeschooling mama to four little blessings. She is passionate about teaching, specifically literacy. She is the author of This Reading Mama, where she shares reading and writing activities as well as literacy curricula and printables. You can connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Google +.

25 Books with Crafts To Match

craft ideas for preschoolWhen I started No Time For Flash Cards I started it with the intention of trying to give my friends who were at home with their kids some fun activities to fill in their day. When I taught I would always link the book I read at opening circle time with our art exploration for the day. It gave the students focus and padded the learning on both ends. We didn’t hit the kids over the head with facts or structure but a little themed continuity went a long way in our exploration of the chosen topic.  After more than 5 years of blogging I have paired countless books with crafts. Consider this list of 25 a cheat sheet. I hope you find it useful.

For the full craft tutorials click the craft title under each pair. The book title is an affiliate link and will take you to Amazon.com
 

craft for if you give a mouse a cookie 1. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff and Puffy Paint Cookie Craft .

knight craft and book

2. Small Knight and George by Ronda Armitage and Knight’s Shield Craft readmake14

3. Planting a Rainbow by Lois Elhert and Sticky Window Flower Garden readmake21

4. The Very Busy Spider by Eric Carle and Spider Web Walking . readmake19

5. Firefighter Frank by Monica Wellington is a wonderful read before working on writing and counting with our  Count & Write Fire Trucks .readmake17

6. How Big Is a Pig? by Claire Beaton and Paper Plate Pig Craftreadmake22

7.The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog! by Mo Willems goes perfectly with this Squeeze Painting Hot Dog Craft.

preschool craft

8. The Very Lonely Firefly by Eric Carle and our popular Band-aid Fireflies Craft. craft for leo the late bloomer

9.Leo the Late Bloomer by Robert Kraus goes well with our Paper Bag Tiger Puppet. activity for alphabet under construction

10. Alphabet Under Construction by Denise Fleming is the perfect read before you Build With Letters.activities for the big red barn book

11. Big Red Barn by Margaret Wise Brown can be read before or after you play with this Farm Sensory Bin. tacky the penguin craft idea

12.Tacky the Penguin by Helen Lester and our Simple Penguin Craft . craft for Frederick by leo lionni

13.Frederick by Leo Lionni and a craft especially made to look like Frederickalphabet craft with cars

14. Alphabeep!: A Zipping, Zooming ABC by Debora Pearson and our Car Alphabet is a great match! readmake9

15. Leap Back Home to Me by Lauren Thompson and our Easy Peasy Paper Plate Frog Craft. craft for goodnight moon

16.Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown and our Homemade Puffy Paint Moon.craft for the grouchy ladybug

17. The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle and our simple Ladybug Craft.trashy town craft

18. Trashy Town by Andrea Zimmerman and David Clemesha has been a favorite for years and goes perfectly with our Shape Garbage Truck Craft. swimmy craft idea

19. Swimmy   by Leo Lionni is a wonderful to share while creating this cool School Of Fish Craft. craft for dinosaur vs the potty

20. Dinosaur vs. the Potty by Bob Shea will have your kids laughing and this Dinosaur Craft with have them using their fine motor skills. chicka chicka boom boom craft

21. Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault was the inspiration for this craft. bulldozer books and craft

22. Dig Dig Digging by Margaret Mayo is a great read before learning about shapes with the Shape Bulldozer. princess craft

23. The Very Fairy Princess Julie Andrews and Emma Walton Hamilton is sweet just like our Shape Princess Craft . cloudy with a chance of meatballs craft

24. Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs by Judi and Ron Barrett is a perfect match for our DIY Weather Station. how to catch a star book and craft

25. How to Catch a Star by Oliver Jeffers goes so well with our Make Your Own Constellation Craft.