Easter Craft : Felt Carrot Bag

by Kim

This is not a craft you can do with your child. This is a naptime craft or something you can do with a much older child. This craft is for the little kids, not with them. This idea was inspired by this bag of candy. Too cute!

I used a piece of orange felt, green felt, green bias tape (you can use yarn or any green string), a hot glue gun, and scissors. I suggest using felt. I originally tried this with orange quilter’s cotton and it was way too thin to hot glue. If you want to sew you can use the cotton, but this is a no-sew version that anyone can do. Literally anyone.

I folded the orange felt piece and trimmed the outer edge to make a triangle.

I hot glued the open side together to make a cone.

Then I cut the green felt in half, long ways.

Next I glued the green felt piece to the orange cone. I just glued about an inch at a time and rotated my way around the entire edge of the cone.

After that I cut strips into the green section. Be sure not to go all the way down to where it connects with the orange.

I cut some holes (more like diamond shaped snips) into the cloth with scissors and threaded the biased tape through the holes. This way it will be easier to re-thread when your child pulls the string out. Which we all know is going to happen.

Fill your cone with candy, trail mix, craft supplies, or whatever goodies you choose. Tie the string together. Ta-da!

After Easter it can still be used to hold small treasures. You can make your carrot any size you wish. I am seriously considering adding a long green strap to my daughter’s to make it a carrot bag purse.

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Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It.

Easter Chick Treat Box Craft

This Easter craft was incredibly easy to make. You could make a whole bunch in an evening or have fun just making one and filling it with treats for someone special. If you want to make it even easier you can use sticky back felt , although good quality double stick tape worked great for our chick.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a party treat box ( we found ours at a big box store in their party section), some Easter grass, googley eyes, yellow felt , orange felt, scissors and permanent double stick tape.
  2. Cut a beak and 2 feet out of the felt.
  3. Tape them on.
  4. Tape the eyes on
  5. Put double stick tape along the inner edges of the treat box.
  6. Press Easter grass onto it.

Books About Chicks


Lulu the Big Little Chick by Paulette Bogan is an old familiar tale about a little chick who is frustrated about being too little to do anything so instead she decides to go far far away. When I started reading this to my presently obsessed with superheros son he didn’t want to read it unless the chick had super powers. I convinced him to read it with me to find out and it took all of one page before he was hooked.  He was so worried about how far the little chick would go and why would she want to go in the first place?! The cartoon like illustrations were a perfect compliment and fresh addition to a familiar tale.

This Little Chick by John Lawrence is just about the perfect board book for my daughter right now, she didn’t even try to eat it! The rhymes are melodic the text full of animal sounds is spot on for our littlest readers . My son and I had fun reading this old favorite to my daughter for the first time.  The illustrations are fantastic with lots of contrast and is the perfect length for  a quick snuggle and read for wiggly babies who are eager to move.

Wee Little Chick by Lauren Thompson is a sweet almost saccharine book about a little chick that may be small but is just as capable as everyone else. Honestly I was sorta luke warm to the story. When I sat down to write about it I had to grab the book to remember what I wanted to say, which is normally a big clue that it is not too memorable. What I didn’t forget was how much I loved the illustrations by John Butler.  Soft , gentle, feathery illustrations of farm animals that are full of realistic detail. We all loved the illustrations. SO while there was nothing wrong or off putting about the text it didn’t leave a lasting impression but the illustrations are what make this book stand out.