23 Fall Books with Crafts To Match

fall books with crafts to matchOur first Read & Make post was so crazy popular that I knew I needed to keep this theme going. I see all of you pinning fall ideas on Pinterest and searching for them here on the blog. I thought I would help you out by sharing this easy cheat sheet of 23 fall books with crafts to match.

For the full craft tutorials click the craft title under each pair. The book title is an affiliate link and will take you to Amazon.com
 
 readmakefall25
  1. Fall Mixed Up by Bob Raczka and Shape Scarecrow Craft .craft for a friend for all seasons
  2. A Friend for All Seasons by Julia Hubery and Falling Leaves Craft.craft for apple farmer annie
  3. Apple Farmer Annie by  Monica Wellington and Lacing Apple.ghosts in the house activity ideas
  4. Ghosts in the House! by Kazuno Kohara and Puffy Paint Ghost.craft for plump and perky turkey
  5. A Plump and Perky Turkey by Teresa Bateman and Handprint Turkey Craft craft for donald crews school bus
  6. School Bus by Donald Crews and Cut & Paste School Bus Craft.leaves craft
  7. Leaves by David Ezra Stein and Uppercase Lowercase Letter Sorting Tree.fall books and crafts
  8. Dot & Jabber and the Great Acorn Mystery by Ellen Stoll Walsh and Torn Paper Acorn. readmakefall23
  9. When Autumn Falls by Kelli Nidey and Tape Resist Fall Tree.kissing hand craft
  10. The Kissing Hand by Audry Penn and Kissing Hand Necklaces.inside a house that is haunted
  11. Inside a House That Is Haunted by Alyssa Satin Capucilli and Haunted House Math Activity.pumpkin printing
  12. Patty’s Pumpkin Patch by Teri Sloat and Pumpkin Printing.pumpkin eye activity
  13. Pumpkin Eye by Denise Fleming and Dry Erase Jack-O-Lantern.leaf man craft
  14. Leaf Man  by Lois Ehlert and Leaf Butterfly Craft.fall ideas
  15. I Know It’s Autumn by Eileen Spinelli and Simple Autumn Sensory Tub.big pumpkin craft idea for preschool
  16. Big Pumpkin by Erica Silverman and Pin and Pound Pumpkins.apple picking craft
  17. Apple Picking Time  by Michele Benoit Slawson and Peel and Pick Apple Tree. owl craft
  18. Owl Babies by Martin Waddell and Letter O Owl Craft. candy corn counting and counting book
  19. This First Thanksgiving Day: A Counting Story by Laura Krauss Melmed and Candy Corn Math.football craft
  20. T is for Touchdown: A Football Alphabet by Brad Herzog and Simple Football Craft.scarecrow craft
  21. Big Red Barn by Margaret Wise Brown and Paper Plate Scarecrow.dem bones
  22. Dem Bones by Bob Barner and X-ray X letter Craft.leaf craft for kids
  23. Leaf Jumpers by Carole Gerber and Tape Resist Leaves.

craft ideas for preschool

Want more Read & Make ? Check out the first post in this series with 25 popular children’s books and matching crafts. Click the image to jump to that post.

 As stated above this post contains affiliate links.
 

Fall Farm Sensory Tub

One of our favorite things to do in the fall is to go to the Harvest Festival at a farm down the road. Last year we took our apples and pressed them into cider, the kids jumped off bales of hay and my son even rode a horse .  He  has been looking forward to this for a few weeks and when I asked him what sort of sensory tub we should make for his sister he suggested a fall farm sensory tub. So we went to the store to choose what to put in the tub. We looked at all the items and decided on a wild rice and lentil mix and popcorn. If you follow me on Facebook you may have seen this update. It was the trip to gather these items that nearly drove me to drink at 2pm. In the end the massive spill at the store was well worth it because the sensory tub was a hit . Do not miss the tips in the tutorial about what toddlers can gain from sensory bins.

  1. Gather your materials. We used dried wild rice, unpopped popcorn, dried lentils and fake apples and fake acorns. Sometimes I have the sensory tubs ready to go all pretty and presented and sometimes I have the kids help. The day we made this someone refused to nap so she helped with every step. Fist we gathered all the animals that belong on a farm from our playroom. This is a great basic sorting lesson for kids too.
  2. Next we poured our filling in. After putting the popcorn in we took time to draw letters in the popcorn. My daughter loved it . A fun sensory based letter activity.
  3. Add the wild rice, lentils, animals, vehicles,  and farmers ( you may recognize a few characters ).
  4. Play! At first her play consisted of putting animals on the tractor and laughing saying ” Dat animal no drive!” and then replacing it with a figurine of a person. Apparently this is seriously funny to a two year old. I was cracking up at her which was nice after our major shopping meltdown.
  5. Fine motor skills were next. These little apple sauce cups were a perfect for filling and spilling and she filled them one tiny grain at a time.
  6. She counted apples and only tried to eat one . Of all these activities within the activity only one writing in the popcorn was initiated by me. That’s the awesomeness of sensory tubs!
  7. When the filling started scattering on the porch on purpose I gave her one warning that if she threw it down on purpose that I’d pack it all up. Spills from regular play are not disciplined. Still two minutes later she was done and the tub looked like this.I keep the filling in the plastic bags and them inside ziplocs ( usually double them up to avoid bugs) and the toys in a bag so we can pull it out again in a flash. We normally play with one these for a few weeks. Repetition is a great thing for kids it’s not boring so don’t feel like you need a bright shiny new thing every day.

Books

Big Red Barn by Margaret Wise Brown is one of my very favorite books to read to my daughter before bed although it took a while before she warmed up to it. I was worried because I loved reading it to my son and couldn’t wait to share it with her.  The story is simple readers see a day in the life of a big red barn and all the animals inside. Each animal is introduced in the seamless text that reads like a melodic poem. It’s  calm , soothing and Felicia Bond’s illustrations are perfect, I love how the sky subtly changes as the night beckons.  A wonderful book for anytime, but especially poignant before bed.

Fall Mixed Up by Bob Raczka is such a fun fall book for kids. Every page is filled with funny mix ups like Showing pictures of Bears gathering nuts and geese hibernating. My son loved the idea of a Thanksgiving dinner of all candy! I read this to both my kids and while my 2 year old liked the pictures and laughed a long with her 5 year old brother really she was just giggling because he was. My son however thought it was hilarious and corrected each picture as we read. The illustrations by Chad Cameron are stunning as well and a perfect accompaniment to the silly text. If this book doesn’t make you crave a pumpkin spice latte I don’t know what will. Very cute book!

The Cow Loves Cookies by Karma Wilson was as good as I expected it to be and I am a fan of the author. The story has just the right amount of rhyme, rhythm and absurdity that makes for a great picture book. Readers follow along as the farmer feeds all the animals their traditional foods except the cow, the cow loves cookies. The text is paced so well that you can’t help but read it in a sing song and the repetition lends itself to listener participation. Even on the first read your kids will be adding in ” But the cow loves cookies!” . While having fun kids will learn about farm responsibilities, what animals eat and maybe a thing or two about milk and cookies too. The illustrations by Marcellus Hall express so much emotion and have a funky vintage feel that makes the whole book a pleasure to read.

 

How To Make A Simple and Frugal Sensory Tub

Sensory experiences for kids don’t have to be a show stopping three ring circus. I like making elaborate sensory tubs especially for my son since he is getting older and needs ones with specific tasks ( like finding letters, words or sorting objects in them) but a true basic sensory bin is an amazing educational tool. My toddler is just getting to the perfect age for this at 16 months. Exploring the small hard filler, using a spoon and scoop to transfer the grains from one spot to the next and practicing things like sharing with me as we play. Please don’t feel like you need to have all the bells and whistles because for toddlers it’s best to keep it simple and let them discover.

  1. Gather your materials. For this tub I bought some popcorn, barley and dried beans. Total cost for the grains was $2.34. The pumpkins were bought at a patch for $1 for 2 and the spoons and scoop are from my kitchen.  The tub was under $2 and I reuse it by putting the filler from previous tubs into ziplocks and storing to re-use. We had a canning funnel to play with but all she wasnted to do was this which was cute but we moved it to the side so we could get down to digging.
  2. A tip when doing a sensory bin with small grains and a small child. Do it on carpet, if a spill does happen it won’t scatter. You can easily vacuum it up.
  3. Also I am asked all the time how I deal with my daughter putting the beans and grains in her mouth. She doesn’t generally but that is why I use such small grains , they will taste gross if she tried to chew them but they are so small they pose a very small risk of being a chocking hazard. Still stay within arms reach at all times. I used our coffee table ( which is technically a bench)  and sat on the opposite side the while time the tub was within her reach. If your child is not ready for these try this one we made last year
  4. Practice scooping , pouring, talk about the colors of the spoons. Today I think we may have learnt which spoon is yellow and which is orange … I think. I do know we practiced sharing the spoons back and forth accross the table.
  5. I found this interesting, she is cleaning up some of the grains that spilled out. Not something her brother was interested in at her age.

We played with this simple sensory tub for much of the time we had between lunch and picking her brother up from school.  Simple, fun and educational.

Fall Noodle Tree Craft

 by Kim 

The temperatures are tapering off. Summer has gone and Autumn is making its appearance. Whether you live where the lives change or not, this craft is the perfect way to prepare for fall and all of its splendor.

You will need construction paper, glue, sandwich/snack bag, brown marker, cotton swabs, and three colored pasta (uncooked).

You or your child can draw a rectangle on the paper for the tree trunk. Have them color it in. My 5 year old drew his own, my 3 year old just colored.

Put some dry pasta in a plastic sealed bag. I used a snack size bag, but it really doesn’t matter. You want to make sure all of the excess air is out, though.

Have your child crush the noodles. Depending on the brand, they can be difficult to crush. Having the excess air out enables you to have the option of putting the bag on the floor and stomping it, or using a plastic hammer and whacking the bag. Trust me, we have done it all. Obviously the more intense crushing you do the more likely the bag is to rip and make a mess. So just be prepared. Regular crushing (and even stomping) hasn’t ripped our bags yet.

Squeeze some glue onto the piece of paper in the general shape of a tree top. Have your child spread around the glue with the cotton swab. I squeezed glue out for my daughter, but my son did his own glue.

Now sprinkle the noodle pieces onto the glue. This is exactly like giant noodle glitter. You will need to put on a lot, let it dry, and shake off the excess.

The final product looks just like a fall tree. It will have a wide array of colors, too. This craft is great fro talking about Fall, the changing seasons, gross motor skills, fine motor skills, and colors. It also is a great sensory craft.

Look at that texture! It is so much fun to run your fingers across.

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Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It