21 Father’s Day Gifts {kids can help make}

kid made father's day gifts Dads are rad. We need to celebrate all they do for our families with some fun and funky Father’s Day gifts. These Father’s Day gifts go from simple and stereotypical to off beat and quirky. All can be made by kids with some ( sometimes a little sometimes a lot) of help from an adult.

easy father's day cookies

Father’s Day Tie Cookies
Kid Art T-Shirts For Dad
Super Dad Medals
Toddler Made Book Mark
Coupon Book of Experiences With Dad from Carrots Are Orange
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Dad Painting
Crayon Candle
Smart Phone Picture Frame
rad
Custom Cork Board
Write Dad An Action Figure Story
Family Bowling
matching games
Mustache Match Puzzle
Bird Bath ( that kinda looks like The Stanley Cup)
Surprise Notes For Dad ( Printable) from Teachmama
Neck Tie Canvas Art

home depot decoupage
Tool Bench Pencil Holder
Colored Pencil Trivet from Pink And Green Mama
Father’s Day Key Chain & Poem

summer craft for kids
Popsicle Stick Coaster
Fine Art Magnets
Football Craft

What are you making for the dads in your life this year ?

From Drawing to T-Shirt {The Artful Parent}

Transfer A Kids Drawing to A T-Shirt -- Makes a Great Gift!

By Jean Van’t Hul

Do you wonder what to do with all of the art that your kids produce? If your children are anything like mine, they draw and paint a lot. I’m often trying to think of ways to use or display their many masterpieces.

The Artful Parent Book by Jean Van't HulSome go on the wall, some get sent to Grandma, some are stored (and some, frankly, end up in the recycle bin).

While I have a whole chapter on displaying, reusing, and storing art in my new book, The Artful Parent: Simple Ways to Fill Your Family’s Life with Art and Creativity, I’m still always seeking out or thinking up new ideas. This spring, for my husband’s birthday, my daughters and I created t-shirts for him, using transfers of some of their recent drawings.

These T-shirts make great gifts and my kids were literally beaming with pride when they presented theirs.

Here’s how to make them…

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Transfer a Child’s Drawing to a T-Shirt

MATERIALS

  • Children’s drawings
  • T-shirt(s)
  • Fabric transfer paper (This is widely available at craft stores, office supply stores, and online. If you have a white or yellow t-shirt, make sure to get the kind that says for light-colored shirts. And ditto for dark-colored shirts. You’ll need the packet that specifies dark colored shirts if you’re working with blue or black…)
  • Ink-jet printer/copier
  • Scissors
  • Iron

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INSTRUCTIONS

1. Copy your children’s drawing onto the fabric transfer paper following the instructions on the packet.

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2. Cut out the image, rounding corners as you go as much as possible.

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3. Match the drawings up with the T-shirts.

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4. Iron your shirt to remove any wrinkles and then then position the drawings as desired.

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5. Next, follow the packet instructions to iron the drawings onto the shirts. This will vary depending on whether you are transfering onto light shirts or dark shirts. It may even vary from brand to brand so make sure to read the instructions provided.

Here’s what we did:

For light-colored shirt transfers: Turn the transfer paper image side down. Iron the paper to the shirt. Let cool, then peel off the paper backing.

For dark-colored shirt transfers: Peel off the paper backing first and then arrange the image right side up. Cover image with ironing paper provided then iron the image onto the shirt. Let cool then remove the ironing paper.

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Here’s my older daughter, Maia, pulling the paper backing off to reveal her owl drawings.

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And here’s my three-year-old Daphne’s very first person drawing transferred onto an oatmeal-colored shirt after we (um, I) botched the first attempt onto the navy shirt by not reading the instructions properly. Ahem. So learn from my mistakes, folks!

This is not a difficult process at all, but the iron-on instructions are different depending on whether you’re doing the light or dark T-shirt transfers.

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The girls wrapped the shirts with birthday paper and lots (and lots!) of tape and ribbon. They were SO excited to present their Daddy with the shirts they had made with their own drawings.

We’ve since made several more T-shirts using fabric transfers of their drawings. They each made a shirt for themselves. And I’ve heard rumblings that one or two might be in the works for me as a Mother’s Day present…

Jean Van't HulJean Van’t Hul writes about easy and fun arts and crafts ideas at The Artful Parent and has a new book out, The Artful Parent: Simple Ways to Fill Your Family’s Life with Art and Creativity, that combines the whys and how-tos of children’s art with 60 all-time favorite activities.

Father’s Day Crafts and Books

I am so behind on Father’s Day this year , well to tell you the truth it always sneaks up on me.  I have some great new books to share and some of our favorite crafts from Father’s Days past. I hope you find something wonderful to make or inspire your own Father’s Day craft creations! If you want to see how we are celebrating Father’s Day I wrote a post about it on my FamilyEducation.com blog ( if you are my husband do not click your surprise will be ruined! ).

Father’s Day Crafts

This year I found a bunch of new ( to me) books that all celebrate the relationship between father’s and kids ( mostly sons) but you can also check out our previously reviewed Father’s Day Books .

Daddy and I… by Eloise Greenfield is a great little board book about the every day things that a toddler son may help his dad with.  From painting, to shopping to stopping for some hugs this book is great for toddlers to see all the things that make up being a dad and caring for your family. It also has a great lesson about children pitching in to help keep a family going too.

Daddy Hug by Tim Warnes got a great yes vote from my 11 month old who enthusiastically signed ” more” after I turned the last page. Using a bunch of animals to illustrate all the things daddies are like strong, scruffy, hungry, tender… the author with the help of  illustrator Jane Chapman create a nice read aloud that walks the line between silly and touching very very well. I like this book and like how no matter what your daddy may be you will find him in this book.

Dad, Jackie, and Me by Myron Ulburg is a touching look at father’s and son’s and the complex relationship that develops at the same time as tackling bigger themes like discrimination and baseball.  A father and son share a love of baseball and specifically of Jackie Robinson. This book handles these multiple themes very well and will likely create a few lumps in your throat as you read the sometimes achingly honest text. I really liked this book and how it linked different kinds of discrimination, adversity and the way the human spirit can triumph over both.