25 Playful Ways To Work On Fine Motor Skills

 fine motor skillsAs parents we sometimes take things like reading and writing for granted.  For our young kids these skills are huge hurdles in the first few years of formal education. Whether your child is educated  at home or in a school much time and effort is spent on these basics. Working on fine motor skills can help your child develop the hand strength and dexterity they need for handwriting. Tracing letters over and over again isn’t the only option you have . These playful fine motor activities that will develop their skills while they have fun learning . Other than these fun educational ideas some toys that promote fine motor skills include Lego, Perler beads , and lacing cards.

Pin & Pound Pumpkins
Dry Erase Mazes
Cork Board ABCs
Bead & Spell
Alphabet Glue Tracing
Button Excavation
Unwrap & Count Corks
Pound and Learn Hammering
Clothes Pin Patterns
Feather Color Match
Nuts & Bolts Spin Spelling
Simple Cereal Bird Feeders
Paint Chip Color Match
Q-tip Painted Easter Eggs
Nature Cutting
Button & Cork Builders
Playdough & Bead Animals
Lock & Key
Playdough Kabobs
Rhyming Peg Board
Shell Sorting
Letter Rainbowing
Dry Erase Word Search
Design Your Own Lacing Pattern
Cereal Bracelets

This post contains affiliate links.

Rainbowing – Colorful Handwriting Practice

by Kim

I use this activity to help my kindergartener son practice his spelling words. Because let’s face it, memorizing things isn’t fun for young children. Since my 3 year old daughter thinks she should do everything her big brother does, I adjusted this for her to practice her letters, numbers, and writing practice.

All you will need to do this simple activity are paper and crayons. That’s it.

I drew an upper and lower case A for my daughter and her friend. But we also did a couple of numbers and threw in some shapes, too.

Have your child trace the letter, shape, or number with any color crayon. As they are tracing it have them say it out loud, too. For letters we say the letters and then say the sound they make. For shapes we will say the shape and then say something that is that shape. You get the idea.

Have them trace over the object again with a different color crayon.

Then have them repeat it again with another color, and so on until all seven colors of the rainbow are used.

Our friends had a little trouble getting the idea at first, they wanted to draw another one next to the one I had drawn. But with a little bit of guidance they saw that it would make that one a rainbow and then they were eager to do it.

Now you have a rainbowed letter (or number or shape).

This is a very easy way to get your child to do repetition without making it seem like doing the same thing seven times. It is great for handwriting and pencil grasp practice, along with recognition of letters, shapes, numbers, and colors. It really is a lot of fun and your refrigerator will soon be covered with rainbowed objects. Just a warning.

 

Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It.

Frustration Free Dry Erase Mazes

This week I dove into Pinterest full on. I love the ideas that are out there and for creative bloggers it’s this fine balance between getting inspired and feeling like everyone else has all the best ideas. After brushing myself off, telling myself not to act like my children I dove back in and fell in love. All of this is to explain that I got this idea from a pin – after seeing these great labyrinths from bloesem kids I thought how can I make it so it encourages writing but is low on the frustration meter. This is what we did.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a CD case, some plain paper, markers, scissors and dry erase markers.
  2. Start by taking the liner out of the cd case and tracing it to make your own liners – we made 4 by folding and layering the paper before cutting.
  3. Next make the mazes. Ok so you could totally print some off the internet too and I encourage you to do this because man making mazes isn’t super easy, but maybe I am just maze challenged.
  4. Pop them all in a stack and into your case facing the back . Now your child can do a few at a time or all in one sitting.
  5. Add your kid and dry erase – mistakes are no biggie and look , writing practice!
  6. If you make a mistake , just wipe and try again!

You really should check out bloesem kids they have some magnificent ideas.