Rainbowing – Colorful Handwriting Practice

by Kim

I use this activity to help my kindergartener son practice his spelling words. Because let’s face it, memorizing things isn’t fun for young children. Since my 3 year old daughter thinks she should do everything her big brother does, I adjusted this for her to practice her letters, numbers, and writing practice.

All you will need to do this simple activity are paper and crayons. That’s it.

I drew an upper and lower case A for my daughter and her friend. But we also did a couple of numbers and threw in some shapes, too.

Have your child trace the letter, shape, or number with any color crayon. As they are tracing it have them say it out loud, too. For letters we say the letters and then say the sound they make. For shapes we will say the shape and then say something that is that shape. You get the idea.

Have them trace over the object again with a different color crayon.

Then have them repeat it again with another color, and so on until all seven colors of the rainbow are used.

Our friends had a little trouble getting the idea at first, they wanted to draw another one next to the one I had drawn. But with a little bit of guidance they saw that it would make that one a rainbow and then they were eager to do it.

Now you have a rainbowed letter (or number or shape).

This is a very easy way to get your child to do repetition without making it seem like doing the same thing seven times. It is great for handwriting and pencil grasp practice, along with recognition of letters, shapes, numbers, and colors. It really is a lot of fun and your refrigerator will soon be covered with rainbowed objects. Just a warning.

 

Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It.

Letter Of The Week – Letter L Theme

We are almost half way through the alphabet with our Letter of The Week theme series. These theme posts are meant to bring together upper and lowercase letter crafts, crafts and projects that begin with the letter and whole alphabet books and activities. Why do this? To make it easier for you to find what you need for every letter.

{Letter L Crafts}

Ladder L- Leaf L -Lighthouse l Love L

{Crafts & Activities That Start With L}

lantern craft

Ladybug CraftLadybug Math- Lanterns- LeavesLego MeasuringLeopard Craft- Lightning BugsLove Bugs

{ Alphabet Books }

 

The Alphabet from A to Y With Bonus Letter Z! by Steve Martin was introduced to me by Rebecca when she sent it in for this post . When I saw it at the library I grabbed it and so glad I did. It’s a fun book with silly rhymes for each letter and I was surprised that my son sat all the way through it. It’s a pretty long alphabet book for a toddler. I liked the details in the illustrations even if the sometimes gross humor was not my favorite, but kids will love it !

Alphabeep!: A Zipping, Zooming ABC by Debora Pearson is a great book for older toddlers and preschoolers. The transportation themed book uses rhymes and colorful illustrations to go from A to Z. The text was a bit long for my young toddler but I shortened it and he was able to enjoy the book , children 2 and up will love it just the way it is! This ison my must buy list.

{ Whole Alphabet Activities}

Alphabet Sensory Tub - Car AlphabetFamily Letters

 

Letter Of The Week – K Theme

Letter of The Week is one of our most popular series. If you want to know more about my approach to letter of the week and how I have used it in my classes and home I explain it all here. We believe in playing with letters, playing with books and playing with language in it’s many forms. Kids learn best through hands on experiences so expose them to the world of letters through their world of play. Our eBook has a whole alphabet full of crafts as well as some exclusive never seen on the site!

Letter K Crafts

Key KKing K - Kite K

 K Activities

Kandinsky Inspired Project - Knight’s Shield –   Lock & Key Match

Letter Activities For The Whole Alphabet

Fun with Alphabet Beads  - Post Office Letter Sorting Sandpaper Letter Tracing

 

Letter Of The Week – F Theme

Letter of the week is a great way to introduce a letter. While I don’t use the classic letter of the week system I have used one letter craft a week as the focus of crafting for ONE DAY. The rest of the week and even the rest of that day is for focusing on the alphabet as a whole, how letters work together and in context.  I have already done this for A , B, C, D and E and so I start this school year off with F . Of course we also have our Alphabet Crafts eBook , and all our letter of the week crafts we’ve done previously as a resource as well. Remember to include the whole alphabet every day to keep learning in context , for that I have included some great alphabet books and activities below.

{Letter F Crafts }

Feather FFire FFish FFlag FFood F

{Crafts and Activities That Start With F }


Fire Trucks- Fireworks - Fish - Fishing GameFlags- Flowers- FootballFrankenstein- Frogs

{Whole Alphabet Crafts and Activities}


Letter DominoesLetter MemoryOn The Go Letter Search- Alphabet Sensory Tub

{Alphabet Books}

Eating the Alphabet: Fruits & Vegetables from A to Z by Lois Ehlert is an alphabet book extraordinaire and perfect for a letter F eek, since it’s all about food!  Wonderful paintings of fruits and vegetables seem ultra simple and it is but somehow the way the author has pieced this simple book together is brilliant. Maybe it’s that children learn about food at the table multiple times a day and feel proud being able to identify not only some of the letters but some of the pictures too! From a teaching standpoint I love that there are both upper and lower case letters on each page! This book will grow with your child, and beware it will also make you hungry!

Alphabet Soup by Scott Gustafson is a treat! I read a lot of alphabet books and this one stands out for so many reasons. Otter is hosting a potluck and his animal friends are all bringing something to share. Each page is devoted to an animal with a coordinating food item and more. This book is reminiscent of Graham Base’s Animalia but mush more toddler friendly. Where Animalia is great for older children because it’s so full of detail, this book brings it down a notch but still enchants you with stunning illustrations and fantastic coordinating text.

ABC USAby Martin Jarrie is another beautiful alphabet book!  Like most alphabet books it devotes a page to each letter with vibrant illustrations . Not everything in this book is by any means unique to the United States but most are. I specifically appreciated the I for Immigrants page, both from a historical and personal perspective, my son loved the J for Jazz and we both loved all the whimsical illustrations. There are a lot of learning opportunities presented as well, school age children could really benefit from it as well the 2 letters that stood out for me for further learning were U for Underground Railroad and V for Valley Forge.  How ever you use this it’s worth a look for certain.

3D Word Search

When children are learning to read playing games with their developing skills is a great way to practice while playing. This giant 3D word search can be used so many ways. For my almost 5 year old I put in simple words he could recognize or easily sound out.  I also helped him by making all the words a consistent color and horizontal only. With younger children it can still be a fun game simply looking for specific colors or letters. With older ones you can make words multi colored, going every which way. The learning isn’t just in the searching either, using the dry erase marker to carefully circle the letters or words is fantastic writing practice and the foam letters are a sensory experience too.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a sturdy backing like a inexpensive canvas or even some cardboard, contact paper ( which will make it wipe off) foam letter stickers ( two packs) and scissors. Also a dry erase marker to play with.
  2. Start by covering your canvas or card board with clear contact paper. This makes the surface friendly for dry erase . I found that a baby wipe worded the best to get the marker off after we played.
  3. Start making a column of letters.
  4. Decide on some words to pop in. Like I said in the preamble you can customize this to your child’s specific stage of learning.
  5. Add the words mixed with some random letters.
  6. Invite your child to play. I meant to make a list of the words I included but forgot and it turned out we didn’t need them. You may want one though.
  7. Oops he circled the o but it was no biggie because it’s dry erase!

I was fascinated by which words he knew by sight and which he sounded out. He loved this and I can see myself making a few more over the next few months for sure.