Write and Trace Place Mats

My son has been asking how to spell things for some time, but now he wants to know how to write them too. Problem is he’s not proficient in writing yet but refuses to let me help. So instead of the whole process ending in frustrated tears we made these place mats. So easy to make and for the same price as one pre made place mat you can buy a whole roll of contact paper and make a bunch. Remember only to use washable markers on them and you will be set!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need contact paper, a marker , some paper towels, stickers, and scissors.
  2. Start by writing out the words or letters for the mat.  Make sure the marker you use doesn’t bleed. I used paper towels because they are a perfect size for a place mat. Paper will work just fine.
  3. Add your stickers. My son wanted a fire truck themed one and I made an alphabet mat for him as well.
  4. Cut your contact paper so you sandwich the place mat in it. Place the place mat face down to help avoid bubbles.
  5. Smooth and trim the edges.
  6. Start writing!  This was a huge hit with my son and the place mat can double as a mat for play dough, art and eating too!

Letter Crafts

I have been asked about the return of our ever popular Letter of The Week craft that was published most Mondays. It will be returning next month until then browse our uppercase and lowercase crafts or for an easy alphabetically organized collection and 5 exclusive (never been or  to be published on the blog) crafts check out my Alphabet Crafts eBook!

Glue Tracing

letter tracing with glue

This glue tracing activity saved my sanity and worked on my son’s pre-writing skills. My son loves glue and I fell in love with this post over at Play Activities - yesterday while trying to keep my sanity with a newborn who wouldn’t sleep and a 3 year old who only wanted to play soccer… in the living room, I busted it out.  Simple, fun and you can let it dry and use the sheets again. My son really loved it ( thank goodness), oh and it works their fine motor and hand eye coordination too!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some paper ( heavy is better so the glue won’t seep through if they use a little too much), a marker and glue.Glue Tracing
  2. Start by writing letters , making shapes , numbers or even just designs.Glue Tracing
  3. Hand them the glue and have them trace.Glue TracingGlue Tracing
  4. If it’s too tricky grab some new paper and make the letters larger.
  5. Let dry and trace and feel them with your fingers!Glue Tracing

Sensory Alphabet Activities

by Katy
Sensory Alphabet Activity
One of the best ways to help a child learn is to have them use more than one sense at the same time.  I’m guessing that’s one of the reasons why Allie is so passionate about doing crafts with kids–all kinds of senses are engaged, which makes learning easier and also fun. It can be hard, though, when your child has issues that prevent them from participating in crafts.  Today I’m sharing three ways to do the alphabet with kids with limited motor skills although I think they would be fun for all kids.
Alphabet StampsSensory Alphabet Activity

I bought a pack of foam letters at Walmart for one dollar and turned them into two activities.  First, I used them as stamps and let Charlie stamp on a sheet of paper.  As we’re stamping out the letter, it’s good to name it and tell your child the sound it makes.
I then took the foam pieces and glued them to a piece of cardboard to make an alphabet puzzle.  Since Charlie’s aim is rough, I put all the letters in and then let him pull them out.  I let him decided which letter looked good and then I would again, name the letter he was touching and say it’s sound aloud.
Big LettersSensory Alphabet Activity
This activity is also great for improving fine motor skills–I don’t completely understand the relationship between big motions and improving fine motor, but multiple therapists have told me this, so I’m going to believe them.  Take a sheet of paper and put it up on your refrigerator. Give your child a crayon or marker and help them make BIG letters on the paper.  I found that Charlie was able to make some c-like motions, which is pretty impressive for him.  Children with poor neck control often do better when activities are propped up in front of them because it requires less head control.
Sugar Writing
4
You can also use sand, but sugar is easier for me to find.  Pour about half a cup of sugar into a baking pan.  If you can find one with a dark finish, then that will work great.  Help your child form letters in the sugar with their fingers.  This was probably Charlie’s favorite activity of the bunch–probably because it was one of the few that he was allowed to taste!
As always, don’t be discouraged if you try and activity and your child doesn’t like it.  All children are picky and special needs kids can often be intimidated by new experiences.  Experiment with different ideas, try activities multiple times, and remember that not every activity is going to be a hit.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Katy is a mom of one who loves art, mystery novels, and anything involving peanut butter–she blogs about raising her little miracle at Bird on the Street.