Rhyming Activities For Kids

rhyming lessons for preschool Rhyming is a vital part of literacy development. When children rhyme they play sounds and apply their abilities to new combinations of letter sounds. This is a fun activity for most children but some children really struggle with rhyming. For all kids we should be trying to make this fun. I encourage all parents to rhyme with their kids, it’s an accessible way to work on literacy skills at home and it rarely feels like work!

Here are nine fun rhyming activities for kids to try at home.

rhyming tag cover

 

Rhyming Tag

rhyming rockets done

Rhyming Rockets

find and rhyme game for reading

Rhyming Hide & Seek

rhyming puzzle pieces

Rhyming Puzzle st.patrick's day rhyming treasure hunt

Rhyming Scavenger Hunt

rhyming activity

Rhyming Jars

Rhyming pegboard literacy activity for kids

Rhyming Peg BoardRhyming Tree - Early Literacy Lesson

Rhyming Tree

rhyming activity

Spin & Rhyme

8 Ways Parents Discourage Their Kids From Reading

by Allison McDonald ways parents discourage their kids from reading

No parent intentionally tries to discourage their child from reading. But sometimes our actions do just that. Kids may be resilient, but they are also really sensitive, and how we handle reading in our homes can work for or against our kids’ reading attitude. Once a child writes reading off, it’s much harder to reel them back in and get them to give it a second shot. Here are eight  things to avoid .

 

1. Don’t put down your child’s reading materials. Comics and books with crude humor often get dragged through the mud, as do character-driven books. Their choices may not be your favorite, but when you say no to a book, what your child may hear is no to reading. Instead of banning their beloved reading material , find a way to add in some more desirable books into the mix.

 

2. Don’t provide the wrong level material. No one likes reading something that makes them feel stupid. If the books are too hard they will frustrate your child. If the books are too easy, they will bore your little reader. You don’t need to know your child’s exact level; their interest will let you know. Go to the bookstore or library when you have a chunk of time and let them explore. Take out a bunch of books and try them out. Find favorite authors and read everything they’ve written, then start again with a new author.

 

3. Don’t use reading as a punishment. Saying things like  “Go to your bedroom and read!” or “If you do that again, I will make you go read.” sets kids up to associate reading as a negative thing. Keep punishments and reading separate.

 

4. Don’t forget to give your child  books as a gifts. Gifts are special, and starting at birth books make the best gifts – especially if you read them with the person who gave them to you. Book fairs at schools are a great place for kids to get excited about books, and we use them as treats!

 

5. Don’t explain to your child they aren’t really reading yet when they are only looking at the pictures. If we tell our children they aren’t readers, they will believe it, and to a child this isn’t as fluid as it is for adults. They don’t see that reading is developmental, and this blow to their confidence can really stick with them. If they aren’t decoding words yet, let them know that they can “read the pictures” and tell the story that way until they can read the words too.

 

6. Don’t forget to let your kids see you read for fun.  Studies show that kids with parents who read often for pleasure are more likely to read for fun themselves. So if you want a kid who loves to read, let them see you reading too.

 

7. Don’t over-correct and over-practice. It’s exciting when your child starts to read independently, but forcing them to read and reread text until they have it perfect is not the most effective way to encourage or instruct. Read with your new reader and help when they ask for it. If they miss a word but the meaning is intact, don’t interrupt. If the meaning of the sentence is all screwy, wait for a natural pause and ask them, “Did that make sense?” You can revisit the word if it didn’t. Use the pictures and the rest of the text as clues if the word is too tough to decode.  If you have to do this often, the text is too hard for your child. Choose something easier, or if they are insistent take turns reading so there is some fluency being modeled.

 

8. Don’t forget to read to your kids. Every day. Even those days when you just want them to go to sleep already!!
Check out Scholastic Parents Raise a Reader blog for more simple ways to bring literacy into your family. Together with Amy from Teachmama.com I share with readers  tips, tricks and tried and true ways to Raise a Reader.

This post contains an affiliate link.

Spin & Rhyme

by Kim

Title Pic

Rhyming is such a crucial part of reading. Not to mention it can be plain out fun and silly at times. Banana-nana-fo-fana (you now have that stuck in your head, sorry). Here is a super easy activity that encourages rhyming, word families, and practices breaking down words to read.

Supplies

Supplies:

  • Paper towel roll
  • Dry cleaner hanger
  • Scissors
  • Marker

Cut your paper towel roll into sections.

Cut tube

Write the ending sound of a word on a section. You can write another word fragment on other sides, too. I wrote “an” and “at” on this one.

Rhyme 2

Rhyme 1

Now write letters or the first sounds of words on another piece of cut tube. You can throw in some weird ones that will not make words to get some giggles, too.

First sound

first sound 2

While I was writing, I had some help. Little sister loved helping out with writing all over her piece. She is actually a lefty, so this is photo is hilarious to me. At least she is interested. ;)

Playing

Pull out one end of the hanger from the bar.

Remove bar

Slide your tube pieces on and replace the hanger end back inside the bar.

make a rhyme 2

Now your child can spin the first letter (or sound) of the word to make different words.

make a rhyme

You can practice rhyming as you go through them. It is fun to sing out the words and maybe dance a bit, too. But we are pretty active around here and I am sure your house is just as wild spirited.

On the go

My favorite thing about this is that it transports so easily. I know we can grab it and take it to another room without messing it up and causing a meltdown. It hangs easily on the toilet paper roll holder so we can play while we take our extra long potty breaks. It keeps my kids engaged while I do things in the kitchen and even can hang on the back of mommy’s seat in the van for playing while we run errands.

I hope you enjoy this activity as much as we do.

 
Kim is a contributing writer for No Time For Flash Cards, a mom to a toddler, a preschooler, a first grader and a foster parent, too. She juggles her day by trying out fun activities and crafts with the kids. After all, she is just a big kid herself. See what she has been up to over at Mom Tried It.

10 Word Games For Kids

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Sight word knowledge, rhyming, spelling and letter recognition are all skills that kids let slide during the summer. There is not reason all these skills can’t be put into games and fun activities so your child avoids the summer slide and have fun at the same time. All — of these focus on fun and learning!

Pizza Delivery & Reading Game
Word Families
Read & Find
Listen & Find Word Search
Giant 3D Word Search
Spin & Spell
Rhyming Tree
Halloween Word Search
Spelling Puzzles
Rhyming Jars