Cutting Practice Thanksgiving Wreath

Thanksgiving wreath craft cutting practice Whenever we do a craft ( not open ended art) I try to mix in a few things. Usually some color or letter recognition, maybe some tricky fine motor  skill development with small bits and pieces, or cutting practice! This Thanksgiving craft is all about cutting practice. For little guys it’s all about getting the grip right, hand position, and control.  Cutting isn’t something that most kids have to be tricked into doing many love it and our Cutting Station is a great idea for those kids.

Gather your materials. You will need a paper plate for each wreath, some glue, construction paper ( this is a great craft for scraps!), some glitter glue ( it’s not really a craft according to my daughter unless it has glitter), and some raffia.cutting practice

Start by cutting the middle out of the paper plates and cutting the construction paper into easier to hold strips. Older kids can do this themselves. cutting wreath collage for thanksgiving

Start cutting! cutting practice thanksgiving wreath for preschool My son joined in on the fun too. cutting skills wreath

When they have cut to their heart’s content add some glue. cutting practice scissor skills wreath

Add the paper in a pattern or randomly. scissor skills thanksgiving activity for kids

Time for glitter glue. This glitter glue is great because it doesn’t get everywhere like regular loose glitter but it does take a long time to dry if you make globs.paper cutting skills wreath

Add some raffia-ish ribbon and hang it up. thanksgiving wreath craft

 

Books About Thanksgiving

All book lists include affiliate links.

a-plump-and-perky-turkey

A Plump and Perky Turkey by Teresa Bateman is such a cute and funny book about a town that needs a turkey and the hilarious lengths they go to to find one. The town is sadly outwitted by the turkey and end up eating shredded wheat for thanksgiving. The illustrations kept my little man interested when he was a toddler but he only started understanding the dark humor at around 4. I love this book because of the humor makes me giggle. My son was a little off put by the idea of the towns folk eating the turkey and was relived when he escaped before they shoved him in the oven. I like that he is starting to understand that the meat he eats is actually a cooked animal, we take that for granted but for many young kids this is a huge realization!

two bad pilgrims

Two Bad Pilgrims by Kathryn Lasky is a fantastic book that some parents might not like but kids will love it and learn a lot in the process.  It’s about two boys who really did sail abroad the Mayflower and whose behavior really was bad.  There is a ton of not usually shared information about Pilgrims in this book and as someone who studied colonial history I am in LOVE with this book. The format is a mix of non fiction and comic strip like narrative. I would read it to kids 5 and older although younger children might like just the narrative. There is a ton of info in this book and it would be a wonderful tool to talk about how history books don’t always tell the whole story.

Thanksgiving

Twas The Night Before Thanksgiving by Dav Pilkey was such a treat to read. It’s a reworking of the classic Christmas poem, with a Thanksgiving twist.  A bus full of kids head off to the turkey farm the day before Thanksgiving and are immediately enamored with the birds. When a child asks the farmer what the axe by the door is for… well let’s just say the truth is told and the kids fall apart. They don’t stay down for long though, the kids outsmart the farmer and their teacher to save the turkeys from the axe. Somehow the author finds a way to make the possible slaughter of these happy friendly, named turkey’s funny. My son was giggling while I was kinda nervous that they’d get the axe! Great rhymes throughout this hilarious book!

 

For more Thanksgiving books check out our round up of Thanksgiving books by clicking on the image below.

thanksgiving books

 

Thanksgiving Crafts & Activities For Kids

easy thanksgiving crafts for kids I love Thanksgiving crafts. They are festive but there is almost always a deeper meaning. It’s not just about turkey it’s about the family that gathers around it, it’s not about harvest but about how we can share the harvest, and despite what my son and husband tell me it’s not about football, but cheering together. If there is one thing I love about crafting with my kids it’s our time together. Here are some great Thanksgiving crafts for you to try with your kids.

turkey paper bag puppet for kids

Paper Bag Turkey Puppets

word hunt thanksgiving
Thanksgiving Word Scavenger Hunt

football craft

Stuffed Football Craft

Thanksgiving Lesson Plan
Thanksgiving History Timeline

thanksgiving garland
Thankful Garland

foam turkey magnet edit
Foam Turkey Magnet
spelling stones literacy activity

Thanksgiving Spelling Stones

rp_indian-corn.jpg
Mosaic Indian Corn

Thanksgiving arts and crafts for toddlers
Turkey Baster Painting

thanksgiving wreath
Thank You Hand Print Wreath

Melissa and doug thank you cards

Finger Print Turkey Cards

thanksgiving craft for kids
Family Photo Quilt

scarecrow craft
Shape Scarecrow

 

thanksgiving thankful activity for toddlers
Thankful Box

turkey counting
Counting Turkey

Thanksgiving craft
Turkey Craft For Toddlers

Simple Sensory Tub
Thanksgiving Sensory Tub

Thanksgiving Math with Candy Corn
Candy Corn Math Tray

glitter sun catcher turkey craft for toddlers
Turkey Sun Catcher Craft

shape turkey craft for kids
Shape Turkey Craft

scare crow fine motor
Paper Plate Scarecrow

rp_Learning-Turkey-Kids-Crafts-293x300.jpg
Fine Motor Turkey Craft

marshmallow harvest corn
Marshmallow Indian Corn

potato print turkey craft for thanksgiving
Potato Print Turkey

rp_Pilgrim-hats-002.jpg
Pilgrim Hat Cookies

indian corn craft for kids

Confetti Corn Craft

thanksgiving craft
Bubble Wrap Corn

Dry Erase  doodle mats for Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving Doodle Mats

pumpkin printing in preschool
Mini Pumpkin Prints

turkey cork color sorting
Thanksgiving Color Sorting

turkey feather fine motor matching game for toddlers
Turkey Feather Color Match

gross motor game for thanksgiving
Turkey Feather Hunt

3d thanksgiving turkey craft
3D Hand Print Turkey Craft

turkey fact families for kids
Thanksgiving Math Fact Families

paper plate turkey craft for kids
Paper Plate Turkey

Thanksgiving Doodle Mats

My kids love dry erase activities and these mats were fast to make and they both enjoyed creating with them. They would be perfect for wiggly kids at the  Thanksgiving dinner table before pie is served or on the long road trip to Grandma’s .  With both the dinner plate and Mayflower scenes you can use different prompts and questions to extend the drawing. I have included suggestions below in the tutorial.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some inexpensive canvases or another hard board for a backing, some construction paper , double stick tape, scissors and contact paper. For the Thanksgiving dinner mat I used the plate and fork from Melissa & Doug’s Make-A-Meal Sticker Pad because it’s just so cute and we’d been playing with it earlier so it was fresh in my mind. 
  2. For the Mayflower mat start by cutting out a boat. I could have sworn I had brown paper but no, so I colored some white brown with a marker. Cut some sails, and land as well.
  3. Piece together and secure on a sheet of blue paper with double stick tape.
  4. Cover with contact paper.
  5. For the Thanksgiving dinner mat cut out the plate and fork and tape to a sheet of construction paper.
  6. Cover with contact paper.
  7. Time to create.  I handed my son the Mayflower one and asked a few questions . ” How do you think you would feel seeing land for the first time after such a long journey?” ” What would you pack if you were leaving your home forever?” ” How do you think the Native Americans felt when they saw the huge ship?”
  8. My daughter joined us and started creating her Thanksgiving dinner. I asked her ” What would you like for Thanksgiving?” I got a big old ” Candy!” as the response. She drew spaghetti and ice cream.  With older children you could divide the plate up and ask them to draw foods from each food group, draw a silly Thanksgiving with just their favorite foods or what they usually have at Thanksgiving and talk about traditions.
  9. They happily created and erased over and over. We use socks that can’t find their mates for erasers. 

 

I have had a hard time over them years finding Thanksgiving books that I felt were fun and educational. These books however fit the bill and are sure to work at your house too. Click through for full reviews of these books and a couple other Thanksgiving favorites.

Candy Corn Counting

Counting is fun, counting candy is even more fun!  This is a great thanksgiving themed math activity that promotes ” Checking your work” something that not only encourages kids to slow down ( something my son needs when doing tasks) but it also builds independence and confidence. Amazingly it wasn’t my kids who ate the candy after this activity was done… I can’t help it candy corn is so yummy! If you are not a fan of using candy for activities you can easily substitute pom poms or pony beads for the candy or make a turkey like the craft that inspired this activity.

  1. Gather your materials. I used a cheap cookie sheet with raised edges to keep the candy corn contained . Also some brown and green construction paper, scissors, tape and a marker. Oh and of course some candy corn.
  2. Start by cutting out the green husks. Please remember perfection is not the point, I don’t have time to spare and know you don’t either.
  3. Cut out the ear of corn.
  4. Tape to the cookie sheet.
  5. Add numbers. Try to add some easy and some more challenging. If it’s too easy it’s boring, too hard and frustration sets in, either way learning falls flat.
  6. Add the corn!
  7. Check your work.
  8. Next I flipped the husks over and wrote new numbers on, I added the corn and my son checked my work. I purposely made mistakes on two of the ears, and asked him how to fix them. He subtracted on one and added to the other. It was a great add on to a simple counting activity. I will be doing more “fix my math” activities in the near future because he loved that.

Toddler Handprint Turkey Craft

Thanksgiving craft

This is not a new craft, handprint turkey crafts in their many variations are everywhere and they should be , they are classic and simply a part of childhood!  This one is adapted for toddlers to make them active participants in the creation of the craft. You can often adapt craft projects meant for older children to a toddler’s ability by using different tools, fewer steps ( less detail) and removing small pieces that may be dangerous.  Also I find with messy crafts like this using a booster that allows you to belt your child in is useful, not to force them in any way to do the craft ( which should not happen) but rather to keep them in one safe place after they have messy hands. No one is calm if their child is making a beeline for the couch with hands covered in paint. This way we can focus on the activity not the mess.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a toilet paper ( or paper towel roll), a paper grocery bag or craft paper, paint, a plastic basting brush and plastic plate, glue , scissors and googly eyes* I used googly eyes because my daughter doesn’t mouth them. If you read my posts from 2008 you will see I never used them when my son was this age, because they would go in his mouth immediately. I still watched her like a hawk and only brought them out when it was time to glue. If your child is like my son , just draw the eyes on like I did with the nose.
  2. Cut open the bag and tape it to the table. I love doing this for toddler art , it’s a drop cloth and project all at once.
  3. Start by tracing their hands 3-5 times on the bag. We did 4 and as you may be able to tell that was not easy. If your child is really resistant trace one hand on a cereal box or other scrap paper then cut it out and use that for a template. Don’t upset them before they even get to make a mess !
  4. Time to paint, add multiple colors on the plate.
  5. See why I used a plastic plate?
  6. Also this brush she is using is a plastic basting brush. I chose it because the bristles are sturdy silicone and have never ripped off despite effort to tear it. It’s also big enough for clumbsy toddler fists to paint with.
  7. Expect them to use their hands , although I should mention some kids at this age start showing a real aversion to getting things on their hands , don’t force them to “relax” , instead offer a wet wash cloth to wipe anything off, and support their play even if it’s not what you expected. Many kids don’t like messy play.
  8. Cut the roll in half. Draw a nose or rather beak for the turkey.
  9. Roll the roll in the paint.
  10. Let dry ( I cleaned up the mess while singing to her and giving the roll a minute to dry ). Add glue to the roll. Help your child place the eyes on the glue.
  11. Let the hand prints dry and cut out.
  12. Add glue to the roll and place the cut out hands on the back as turkey feathers. Tip: Use a clothes pin to hold them in place until the glue dries.
  13. Add this to your holiday mantle.