39 Painting Activities For Kids

painting activities for kidsWho says you have to use a plain old brush for painting? Part of raising creative kids is setting them up to  use items in new ways, to look at something and wonder, “What can I make with that?!” A great starting point is to expose them to simple projects likes these and create. Here are 39 different things you can paint with all with different painting activities for kids. Each item takes you to a full tutorial of a project where we used the specific tool.

 

1. Cookie Cutters
2. Noodles
3. Carrots and Zucchinis
4. Bouncy Balls
5. Toy Trucks
6. Potato Masher
7. Paper Towel Rolls ( and other recycling)
8. Flowers
9. Animal Toys
10. Fly Swatter
11. Bubble Wands
12. Q-Tips
13. Bath Poofs
14. Feathers
15. Apples
16. Forks
17. Toy Trains
18. Glass Sponges
19. Combs
20. Marshmallows
21. Bugs
22. Corks
23. Mushrooms
24. Squeeze Bottles
25. Bubble Wrap
26. Blocks
27. Toothbrush
28. Easter Eggs
29. Salad Spinner
30. Kitchen Sponges
31. Bath Toys
32. Onions
33. Ribbons
34. Dish Scrubber
35. Mini Pumpkins
36. Turkey Baster
37. Gloves
38. Potatoes
39. Fingers!

 

Garden Vegetable Printing

toddler activities Painting without a brush is one of my favorite thing to do with kids, especially toddlers who have a hard time controlling small paint brushes. This vegetable printing project is perfect for toddlers. We have painted with fly swatters, trucks, and other vegetables but this was the first time we have picked the fruit and veggies from our own garden . Using fruits and vegetables for art can have great influence on eating them as you will see so don’t shy away from playing with food especially if you have a picky eater.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a few veggies and or fruits ( we used zucchini, carrots, an apple and potato) , paper, paint, paper towel, scissors and a dish or two. summer crafts for kids
  2. Start by pouring paint in the dish and I added pieces of paper towel soaked in the paint , this just helps stop the paint from glopping on too think.
  3. Add the cut veggies and fruit and call your little artist to check them out. She told me what each was and then also told me who in our family likes and dislikes each… and she was right. Kids are fascinating and are listening even when we don’t think they are.
  4. Start printing!
  5. I thought it was cool how she banged the carrots really hard and fast, but the rest were handled carefully.
  6. I moved the paper around as she worked because she is too small to reach the far side.
  7. After she was done printing I cut up some apple and carrots for a snack.
  8. yummy.

Book

The Carrot Seed by Ruth Krauss is a rare gem, it has been in print for over 60 years and has delighted generations . If you aren’t familiar with the story, a little boy plants a carrot seed and everyone tells him “It won’t come up.” this doesn’t stop the little boy from patiently taking care of this little seed, that eventually grows into a giant carrot. The message is a universal one of sticking to your guns even when everyone tells you you should give up. My son loved the story the simple pictures that will bring you back to your own childhood, at least they did for me. A true classic.

 

Animal Track Painting

I can’t even remember what inspired this, I know my son thought of it but I can’t remember now what preceded me saying ” How about making animal tracks?”. All I remember is that he bounded to the table, which is not always the case . This is a fast project, to stretch it out introduce new paint colors , new animals and more paper one at a time.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need some fun toy animals, a plate, paper,markers and paint.
  2. If you want you or your child can draw some scenery.
  3. Spread some paint on your plate and dip your animal in.
  4. Start making some tracks.
  5. Add the next paint color and more paper if you want and keep going.
* After we painted we went for a walk outside and pretended to look for and follow animal tracks. We tippy toed for mouse tracks , hopped for bunny tracks and stomped around the patio when we “found” elephant ones. *Books !



Animaliaby Graeme Base is iconic in teaching circles, you can loose yourself for hours in the detailed illustrations. The book is an alphabet book on steroids! Each page had a wonderful paragraph in each letter such as for the letter L ” Lazy Lions lounging in the local library.” The pages are filled to the gills with pictures of things that start with that letter as well. Parents and kids a like will fall in love!

“Peek-a-Zoo!”by Marie Torres Cimarusti is a vibrant lift the flap book that goes through sounds different animals make while playing peek a boo with the reader. What I like about this book is that the flaps offer a chance for your baby or toddler to anticipate what animal it hiding as well as the sound , so it grows with them. Also the flaps are large enough that little hands can grab them and won’t get frustrated.
“Is Your Mama a Llama? “ by Deborah Guarino is a classroom favorite, I don’t know many preschool teachers who can’t recite most of this book . Readers follow Lloyd the llama as he riddles his way through a bunch of animals until he find the one he calls mom. I like the mix of animals in this book, a little different than your average zoo or farm collection.