Cork Turkey – Easy Thanksgiving Crafts

cork turkey easy thanksgiving crafts I brought these corks up to the playroom to make something completely different but we didn’t have all the supplies I needed for that craft. After making a totally different Christmas craft ( I will post it later this week) we started cleaning up and inspiration struck! I grabbed a few more supplies and explained my idea to my daughter. She loved the idea and even suggested we use them to decorate our Thanksgiving dinner table. Here is how we made these easy Thanksgiving crafts.

cork turkey craft for thanksgiving supplies

Gather your materials. You will need some cupcake liners, wine corks, googly eyes, markers ( we used these smelly ones <– affiliate link), a little red and orange paper, glue, and scissors.

smelly markers cork tueky craft

If you are using smelly markers you must of course check out the scents. These holiday scented ones are rad, although the red one smells so much like candy canes that I want to eat it. cork turkeys for preschool

Next fold the liners in half and color the liners with whatever colors you want. cork turkey craft for kindergarten

While your child is coloring cut out the gobble and beak. Once they are all colored it’s time to add the glue to the corks. Don’t worry if it drips, it will dry clear. cork turkey crafts for thanksgiving

Add the eyes, turkey craft with corksgobble, and beak. turkey craft made with corks

Next add some glue to the cork and lay on the colored liners.cupcake liner turkey craft with corks Let dry. cupcake liner and cork turkey crafts for thanksgiving

 

Books About Thanksgiving

All our book lists contain affiliate links.

a-plump-and-perky-turkey

A Plump and Perky Turkey by Teresa Bateman is such a cute and funny book about a town that needs a turkey and the hilarious lengths they go to to find one. The town is sadly outwitted by the turkey and end up eating shredded wheat for thanksgiving. The illustrations kept my little man interested when he was a toddler but he only started understanding the dark humor at around 4. I love this book because of the humor makes me giggle. My son was a little off put by the idea of the towns folk eating the turkey and was relived when he escaped before they shoved him in the oven. I like that he is starting to understand that the meat he eats is actually a cooked animal, we take that for granted but for many young kids this is a huge realization!

10 fat turkeys

10 Fat Turkeys by Tony Johnston was a classroom favorite, it’s about as silly as a book gets and the kids had no clue they were actually learning about subtraction while listening to the crazy rhymes. This won’t explain the pilgrims , or talk about the Mayflower, but it will make your kids laugh! Very cute!

Twas the night before Thanksgiving

Twas The Night Before Thanksgiving by Dav Pilkey was such a treat to read. It’s a reworking of the classic Christmas poem, with a Thanksgiving twist.  A bus full of kids head off to the turkey farm the day before Thanksgiving and are immediately enamored with the birds. When a child asks the farmer what the axe by the door is for… well let’s just say the truth is told and the kids fall apart. They don’t stay down for long though, the kids outsmart the farmer and their teacher to save the turkeys from the axe. Somehow the author finds a way to make the possible slaughter of these happy friendly, named turkey’s funny. My son was giggling while I was kinda nervous that they’d get the axe! Great rhymes throughout this hilarious book!

Turkey Feather Hunt { Gross Motor Game}

This easy Thanksgiving themed game has been lovingly named ” Naked Turkey” at our house . It is so fast to make but the fun will last for a long time. Kids love searching for things and games like this not only works on concentration it also naturally leads to counting, color recognition and sorting.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a clean jar, some orange or brown construction paper, some some, googly eyes , tape, markers and feathers.
  2. Start by cutting out a turkey torso. Think chubby bowling pin cut in half. Add a gobble, beak and glue on some eyes.
  3. Tape to the jar. I am taping it because I love these jam jars and plan on using it for something else after we are done with this game. As you can see my daughter was collaging scrap paper while I made it, or so I thought.
  4. Choose a spot in your house to hide the feathers. I do it in my living room because I can shut the doors and keep the kids out while I hide them. Also in a relatively small space a toddler won’t get overwhelmed. do what works for your kids. Can you see any feathers in this picture?
  5. Invite your feather finders and play! She loved this and so did my son after he got home from school ( but the light was even worse by then so no pics).
  6. After she found them all we counted them and sorted them by color, purple first of course!

Since making this on Friday we have played daily with no signs of getting tired of it. My son loves to be the hider and tried to stump my husband and I . I particularly love that the game isn’t too messy to play anytime no matter who is over for Thanksgiving dinner!

 

21 Easy Thanksgiving Crafts For Kids

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kids crafts Every time I’ve asked my kids what they wanted to make this week they both said ” Turkeys!” I warn you now that there may be a bunch of turkey crafts around here this year. Before I start posting too many new Thanksgiving crafts I wanted to make sure we shared our archives of easy Thanksgiving crafts . I have gathered simple crafts for Thanksgiving from years past for you to find easily all in one place. Also do not miss our Walk Through History . It will take your child from England , across the Atlantic on the Mayflower and finally to the table at the very first Thanksgiving. Check it out here.

Thankful Garland
Foam Turkey Magnet
Stuffed Football Craft
Mosaic Indian Corn
Turkey Baster Painting
Thank You Handprint Wreath
Shape Scarecrow
Bubble Wrap Indian Corn
Thankful Box
Counting Turkey
Turkey Craft For Toddlers
Pumpkin Printing
Thanksgiving Sensory Tub
Candy Corn Math Tray
Shape Turkey Craft
Paper Plate Scarecrow
Fine Motor Turkey Craft
Marshmallow Indian Corn
Potato Print Turkey
Pilgrim Hat Cookies
Confetti Corn Craft

 

Native American Headdress – this craft was removed after a fantastic discussion with an Native American educator who explained the sacredness of Headdresses and how even a well intentioned craft was not appropriate.I know many of us have created these crafts with children for may years with good intentions but when you know better you do better so I have removed it from my site.

Toddler Handprint Turkey Craft

Thanksgiving craft

This is not a new craft, handprint turkey crafts in their many variations are everywhere and they should be , they are classic and simply a part of childhood!  This one is adapted for toddlers to make them active participants in the creation of the craft. You can often adapt craft projects meant for older children to a toddler’s ability by using different tools, fewer steps ( less detail) and removing small pieces that may be dangerous.  Also I find with messy crafts like this using a booster that allows you to belt your child in is useful, not to force them in any way to do the craft ( which should not happen) but rather to keep them in one safe place after they have messy hands. No one is calm if their child is making a beeline for the couch with hands covered in paint. This way we can focus on the activity not the mess.

  1. Gather your materials. You will need a toilet paper ( or paper towel roll), a paper grocery bag or craft paper, paint, a plastic basting brush and plastic plate, glue , scissors and googly eyes* I used googly eyes because my daughter doesn’t mouth them. If you read my posts from 2008 you will see I never used them when my son was this age, because they would go in his mouth immediately. I still watched her like a hawk and only brought them out when it was time to glue. If your child is like my son , just draw the eyes on like I did with the nose.
  2. Cut open the bag and tape it to the table. I love doing this for toddler art , it’s a drop cloth and project all at once.
  3. Start by tracing their hands 3-5 times on the bag. We did 4 and as you may be able to tell that was not easy. If your child is really resistant trace one hand on a cereal box or other scrap paper then cut it out and use that for a template. Don’t upset them before they even get to make a mess !
  4. Time to paint, add multiple colors on the plate.
  5. See why I used a plastic plate?
  6. Also this brush she is using is a plastic basting brush. I chose it because the bristles are sturdy silicone and have never ripped off despite effort to tear it. It’s also big enough for clumbsy toddler fists to paint with.
  7. Expect them to use their hands , although I should mention some kids at this age start showing a real aversion to getting things on their hands , don’t force them to “relax” , instead offer a wet wash cloth to wipe anything off, and support their play even if it’s not what you expected. Many kids don’t like messy play.
  8. Cut the roll in half. Draw a nose or rather beak for the turkey.
  9. Roll the roll in the paint.
  10. Let dry ( I cleaned up the mess while singing to her and giving the roll a minute to dry ). Add glue to the roll. Help your child place the eyes on the glue.
  11. Let the hand prints dry and cut out.
  12. Add glue to the roll and place the cut out hands on the back as turkey feathers. Tip: Use a clothes pin to hold them in place until the glue dries.
  13. Add this to your holiday mantle.

Clothespin Teaching Turkey

by Katy

For this activity you will need a paper plate, clothes pins, brown and yellow construction paper, scissor, glue, and something to color with. For some reason I had craft confusion and used paint and markers, but that’s overkill.

First, make your paper plate brown–we finger painted because that allows us to work on sensory stuff at the same time. I’m seeing major progress in that my son will paint and also that he’s stopped trying to put the paint in his mouth. Little victories!

Next, cut out a head and beak from the construction paper. Glue them to the plate.

Then you need to color your clothespins. I used markers and did it myself since it’s a little beyond Charlie’s abilities. If your child can do it by themselves, then let them.

Now, for the fun part!

The clothespins become the turkey’s feathers. Use the feathers to do a variety of activities. For us, we were working on identifying colors. You could also do patterns

Since this was our first time doing the activity, we started with only two clothes pins and asked Charlie to select “red” or “blue.” Trying to grab the clothespins has the added bonus of being fine motor practice, but if he’s not able to squeeze properly, they still come off with a tug. If your child has trouble with fine motor, be sure to place the pins far apart to make it easier.

When Charlie correctly identified the blue pin and threw it on the floor, we called it a day!

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Katy is a mom of one who loves art, mystery novels, and anything involving peanut butter–she blogs about raising her little miracle at Bird on the Street.