It might be yucky outside but we can make our own Sunshine!

Sparkly Sun

  1. Gather your Materials. Grab some yellow paint, crayons or markers, some paper cut into a circle or a paper plate, and something to make the rays. I am using left over streamers from a party, but painted strips of newspaper , regular paper cut in triangles or even ribbon would be cool. Glue or tape to keep the rays in place and the most important thing of all, sparkles.
  2. Let your child go nuts covering the body of the sun as much or as little as they want. My son loved these foam paintbrushes I got at home depot for under a dollar each.
  3. With older children have them decide how many rays they want, ask them the number and ask them to count the rays out as they are putting them on. Remember if your child is counting incorrectly, don’t freak out just say something encouraging like ” Oh you almost got it! “- and model the correct counting.
  4. Once the rays are on, spread some glue on the sun and make it sparkle! Let it dry and give it a good shake on the porch or over a sink before letting your child play with it if you want to avoid a sparkly house.
  5. Remember to talk to your child about what they are making, you don’t need to lecture them about the earth and the sun, but you can ask them what they know about the sun, ask them how it feels when the sun is out etc… but as always don’t push it. Kids especially toddlers and preschoolers resist learning when pushed.

Song!



Mr. Sun

Mr. Sun, Sun Mr. Golden Sun,
Please shine down on me!
Oh Mr. Sun , Sun Mr. Golden Sun,
hiding behind a tree!
These little children are asking you ,
to please come out so we can play with
you,
Oh Mr. Sun, Sun Mr.Golden Sun,
Please shine down on me!


Books!

The books today are my “son’s” favorites! They are all board books because he is still young, the great thing about board books is that they are easier for the little guys to turn the pages and of course resist tearing.


” Toes Ears & Nose” by Marion Dane Bauer
“Clap Hands” by Helen Oxenbury
“Diggers” by Fiona Watt and Rachel Wells

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