Playdough Recipes I Love !

My Favorite !

2 1/2 cups flour
1/2 cup salt
3 Tbs. oil
1 Tbs. alum or 3 cream of tartar
2 cups boiling water
food coloring of your (child’s) choice

Mix all ingredients together and you’re done! (You kind of have to be exact in the measurements. If it’s too sticky, I add a little extra oil. If it’s too oily, I add a little extra flour. Too much flour makes it dry out fast.)

Apple Cider Playdough

No-Cook Apple-Cinnamon Play Dough

1 cup apple cider
1 cup salt
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 Tablespoon ground cinnamon

Bisquick Playdough

2 cups bisquick
1 cup salt
2 cups water
1 TBSP cream of tartar or alum
1 TBSP oil
food coloring or kool aid
or
add cocoa, peppermint what ever strikes your fancy too!

pour ALL into a MICROWAVE safe bowl and microwave for 3 mins stop and scrape and stir the bowl

microwave for another 3 mins scrape and stir it should be ready for kneading now if not cook for another minute or so!

Pumpkin Pie Play Dough

Ingredients:
5 1/2 cups flour
2 cup salt
8 teaspoon cream of tartar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 oz pumpkin pie spice (or your own combination of cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and mace)
4 cups water
Food coloring (2 parts yellow, 1 part red)
Mix in a saucepan and heat over medium heat until all lumps disappear. As soon as it cools enough to handle, knead on a flour surface until smooth.
Store in air tight container.
This play dough is not edible, just for playing !!!!!

It smells so good. It is a little oily for me, but it makes for easy clean up.

Comments

  1. Kathy says

    What does the cream of tartar / alum do? I’ve never used them for baking before so I haven’t a clue!

  2. says

    Kathy, I was told that alum is a preservative – also used in pickling. My mom said you can also get it in some pharmacies in bulk for less than McCormicks sells it for in the spice section. Not sure why there would need to be a preservative with all the salt though…

    • admin says

      Yes it is a preservative. Many homemade play dough recipes call for it, many don’t. I got mine at Walmart.

  3. mariss says

    I have also heard and observed that the cream of tarter gives the play dough a nicer texture as well. The alum I have used to keep children from trying to eat the playdough, esp. if it smells really good, however at one job I had a group of pre-k’s that would try and eat it no matter how much I put in..That takes sour heads to a new level for me.. : )

  4. meimy says

    Does anyone know if cream of tartar and alum can be used interchangeably? I already have some cream of tartar and I haven’t been able to find alum in bulk. Can I just use the cream of tartar instead of alum?

  5. says

    Alum and cream of tartar are acidic compounds in cooking. Alum is a naturally occurring mineral (or refined from a naturally occurring mineral). Cream of tartar is a byproduct of wine production.

    Many chemical processes in cooking require acidic environments to work (baking soda, for example) and that acid can come from many forms when cooking depending on the recipe. Cream of tartar, lemon juice, sour cream, and buttermilk seem to be the most common.

    I haven’t experimented with playdough recipes so I’m sure what role the acid plays in it. However, knowing the above I have substituted lemon juice in the recipe when I didn’t have cream of tartar or alum. It works fine.

Trackbacks

  1. […] No Time for Flashcards: My pal Allie rocks at everything preschool and crafty–of course her pumpkin playdough is perfect! (Here are her other playdough recipes.) […]

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