Shape Scarecrow Craft

Scarecrow Craft

I had a reader ask if we  had any scarecrow crafts, I didn’t but I came up with this. shape scarecrow!  There are a lot of steps but my almost 3 year old breezed through it, we talked about the shapes, and each body part as we added them . You will notice that my shapes are way less than perfect, but if they are clearly recognizable you are golden. Time is short for anyone caring for young kids, don’t fret over your shapes being perfect!

  1. Gather your materials. You will need 5 different color pieces of construction paper ( you can use scrap if you want for all but one) we used orange, green, yellow, neutral and light blue , 2 large googly eyes, a marker, scissors and a glue stick.Scarecrow Craft
  2. Start by drawing a scarecrow head and mouth. Cut out. Scarecrow Craft
  3. Next cut out ( or have your child cut out) a triangle hat and rectangle shirt and arms from the green paper. Scarecrow Craft
  4. Cut out many smaller rectangles from the yellow paper for hair.Scarecrow Craft
  5. Cut out a orange triangle for the nose and 3 orange circles for the buttons. Scarecrow Craft
  6. Start gluing. Now you can just let them at it but to me this isn’t a creative project at all, it’s too structured for that, to me this is a shape lesson really.  Here is what I do.  Show your child the shapes and ask them what they look like. I help up the large rectangle and asked my son if he thought this was the scarecrow’s head, ” no it’s his belly!”  Glue it on. Don’t forget to ask what each shape is or label the shape for them.Scarecrow Craft
  7. Next add the head… I suggested this was an arm. My son set me straight! Don’t forget to have fun! frankenstien 019
  8. Keep labeling, and adding the shapes to build your scarecrow. Here he is adding the hair. Scarecrow Craft
  9. Add the arms.Scarecrow Craft
  10. If you are doing this with young toddlers don’t forget to label the colors as well!  Add your hat! Scarecrow Craft
  11. Add the eyes and nose. scarecrow craft
  12. Add your buttons. Scarecrow Craft
  13. Let dry!

Shape Books

Clay quest Mini Search for shapes

Clay Quest Minis: Search for Shapes!by Helen Bogosian is a big hit with my son and me! I was lucky enough to have this book sent to me by the publisher because it’s already come in handy on a ferry, and waiting to be seated at a restaurant keeping my son happy and busy searching for shapes.  This book is an activity book that has a simple rhyme and request for the reader to find 2 shapes on every page.  The shapes are hidden in the adorable clay “illustrations” , really they are photographs of clay sculptures that range in theme from a spider web to dinosaurs to princess crowns and more. My son loves playing ” Detective” and what I like is that the challenge is just right for his age group 2-3 year olds. Younger toddlers will still enjoy it and it’s vibrant colors but to do it independently this is the perfect age.  I try to find negatives with books that are sent to me from publishers for review,  but I am having a hard time this really is a good shape book!

So Many Circles, So Many Squares by Tana Hoban is a picture book that is all about shapes in our environment. There is page after page of pictures of daily life, food, signs etc… with the simple question of finding the shapes in the photos. It’s a great book to use as a launch pad into a shape hunt in your own home or around town and worth a few looks because you will be surprised at the shapes you missed the first time.

Mouse Shapes by Ellen Stoll Walsh is a cute book that not only helps teach shapes it is also entertaining! The three crafty mice use the shapes to protect themselves from one hungry cat finally using them to make scary mice to frighten the cat away! Kids love to help find which shapes are used in the illustrations and older ones can even anticipate what the mice will make next!

Comments

  1. says

    Darling! And…I used to have BUCKETS of crafts I created/discovered when I was director of our Parents’ Morning Out at my church…had I been blogging THEN I’d still have copies of everything!

    So cute :).
    .-= Robin ~ PENSIEVE´s last blog ..Dead faith? =-.

    • admin says

      Thanks!

      Oh Robin I know- I wish I had written down all the crafts I did in my years and years of teaching daycamps every summer I wouldn’t have to brainstorm half as much. Thankfully I remember the last few years pretty well !

  2. Charlee Pensak says

    My son’s school sent home a body form and we decorated it with scrap materials here at home that was a good craft but requires lots of adult help

  3. says

    Oh, I love this scarecrow. We’ll have to try this one at home too! Oh and be sure to check out the book, “Shape by Shape” by Suse MacDonald. It’s my new favorite shape book and my 2 1/2 year old LOVES it!

    • admin says

      Yes -the librarian at children’s story time read that a few weeks ago! That is a wonderful book, I will have to get it from the library for a proper review, thanks for reminding me.

  4. says

    Just had to say that the Mouse books are a big hit with both my kids — Mouse Paint, Mouse Count, etc. We’ve read our copies so much they are falling apart :-)

    This is my first visit to your blog and I’m really enjoying it!
    .-= Marie´s last blog ..Mostly Wordless Wednesdays =-.

  5. says

    So cute! Just stopping by to let you know that I have featured your project on Fun Family Crafts today! You can see it here
    http://funfamilycrafts.com/shape-scarecrow/

    If you have other kid friendly crafts, I’d love it if you would submit them :) If you would like to display a featured button on your site, you can grab one from the right side bar of your post above.

  6. jaime@FSPDT says

    hi Allison, i just wanted to ask if i can use one pic with a link back in a round up post. I think you are on the kbn list for that. Thanks, jaime @FSPDT

Trackbacks

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